Biden Admin. Officials Say Domestic Extremism Is A Top Priority

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Biden Admin. Officials Say Domestic Extremism Is A Top Priority
Attorney General Garland and Homeland Security Secretary Mayorkas say white supremacist extremists pose the biggest threat to the U.S.
SHOW TRANSCRIPT

Biden administration officials say they're ramping up the fight against domestic violent extremism.

Attorney General Merrick Garland and Homeland Security Secretary Alejandro Mayorkas testified Wednesday that white supremacist extremists remain the most persistent, lethal threat in the U.S.

The departments they lead are requesting a combined total of an additional $231 million to combat the rise of domestic violent extremism and domestic terrorism.

The attorney general told senators the investigation into the January 6th insurrection is not over and that prosecuting cases is a top priority for the DOJ.

"In my career as a judge and in law enforcement, I have not seen a more dangerous threat to Democracy than the invasion of the Capitol," Garland testified. "There was an attempt to interfere with a fundamental element of our Democracy – the peaceful transfer of power."

The testimony happened on the same day two former senior officials in the Trump administration gave their accounts of the insurrection.

Democrats on the House oversight committee pressed Former Acting Defense Secretary Christopher Miller for hours about the Pentagon's response.

Miller told lawmakers he disagreed with criticism of it.

"Those of you with military experience who understand the nature of military deployments will recognize how rapid our response was," said Christopher Miller Former Acting Defense Secretary. "Criticism of the military response is unfounded and reflects inexperience with or a lack of understanding of the nature of military operations, or worse, is simply the result of politics."

Miller denied former President Trump had any role in the military's response and said he did not speak to Trump that day.

Former Acting Attorney General Jeffrey Rose also defended the Justice Department's preparation.

He said he didn't want to send troops to the capitol days beforehand because he thinks it could've spread fear of a military coup.