After More Than A Decade, The Newseum Is Closing

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After More Than A Decade, The Newseum Is Closing
Since 2008, the Newseum showcased a history of the press. But the news museum will be closing its doors after years of financial struggles.
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After 11 years, a museum famously known for showcasing every facet of the press, from television to radio, is permanently closing its doors. People are not happy about it.

"Don't close it. Keep it open. People need to come in and see what it's about," Ellicia Carter Anderson said. 

Nine year old Ellicia Anderson spent an entire day visiting exhibits like this one.

"I feel very sad. I wanted to stay open for some reason. For some reason I wanted to stay open but they got to close it. I don't know why," Anderson said.

Others, like Samuel Rippl, made it a point to bring his family to the Newseum while they were visiting D.C.

"I'd been here before, and I really just wanted to show it to my family and because I thought it was cool the first time. Just, like, share the experience with them that I experienced," Rippl said. 

And what an experience. From viewing his favorite exhibit to testing his luck reading a teleprompter. 

"It's kind of cool. It's hard to read the because there's going super fast across the screen," Rippl said. 

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Since 2008, nearly 10 million visitors from around the world have flooded the floors of the Newseum. But it has struggled financially for many years according to a statement posted on its website. Some believe its location and the fact it is not a free museum, like many others throughout the city, led to its demise. 

But others, like Liunig Ming, says an entrance fee is worth it. 

"The [museum] is perfect, very good. It's very helpful. Help people to understand different angle from different part... to know how important the media is very important," Ming said.

The Newseum will open its doors for the last time today....But what about all the artifacts? They will be moved to an undisclosed support center "where they will be housed and maintained." As far as the building itself, it will be used to facilitate graduate programs for Johns Hopkins University.