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Meet the Team

Sarah Schlieder

Reporter

Sarah Schlieder is a graduate of Columbia College Chicago where she studied science journalism. She has worked at prestigious research facilities, including NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center and Johnson Space Center, and Argonne National Laboratory. Sarah currently serves as a science and technology reporter for Newsy. In this role, she reports on the latest news in science, tech and health. Sarah is committed to engaging the public in the extraordinary scientific breakthroughs made every day. To communicate science is to shed a new light on a fascinating world. Sarah’s work educates and informs the public about the science that impacts our daily lives and benefits us most.

  Recent Work
FCC Chairman Ajit Pai
Getty ImagesTech

The FCC Plans To Roll Back Net Neutrality Rules

Turkey bird
Anaterate / CC0Sci/Health

Turkey Poop Might One Day Power Your Home

Planet Mars in full
NASASci/Health

Scientists Throw Cold Water On Mars Water Finding

Tesla's electric semitruck
TeslaTech

Tesla's New Semitruck Might Be Playing Catch-Up

Sun peaking out behind Earth
Qimono / CC0Sci/Health

Scientists Don't Know Where All This Extra Antimatter Came From

Flying ants underneath a window
Keith Williamson / CC BY 2.0Sci/Health

All Those Bugs In Your Home Are Picky About Its Interior

Pilots taking off in plane from water
ICONSci/Health

Plane In Roy Halladay Crash Marketed For 'Non-Pilots' And Low Flying

Cannabis in a person's hand
Stay Regular / CC0Sci/Health

Buying Cannabis-Based CBD Medicines Online Is A Gamble

Blood bag in hospital
rdelarosa0 / CC0Sci/Health

Treating Diseases With Young People's Blood??

Great pyramid amid rubble
Jarek Grafik / CC0Sci/Health

Scientists Found A Secret Chamber In The Great Pyramid

Volcano releasing smoke at sunset
Natalia Collegova / CC0Sci/Health

Climate Change Might Make Effects Of Major Volcanic Eruptions Worse

Two-headed dog
Gunter Weib / CC by 3.0Sci/Health

These Real-Life 'Mad Scientists' Are Straight Out Of Science Fiction

Drawing of a sinosauropteryx
University of BristolSci/Health

This Masked Dinosaur Was An Expert At Camouflage

Person holding cellphone with both hands in lap
StockSnap / CC0Sci/Health

Digital Mental Health Therapy Is Improving, But It's Still Not Perfect

Artist's rendering of 2 neutron stars colliding
LIGO/CaltechSci/Health

What The Latest In Gravitational Waves Tells Us About Neutron Stars

Ozone hole at its maximum
NASASci/Health

Something Might Be Keeping The Ozone Layer From Healing Itself

Father holding newborn child
Stock Snap / CC0Sci/Health

No, Parenting Likely Won't Make You Miserable

Person holding gun with both hands
SkitterPhotoSci/Health

Some Physicians Want Gun Violence Labeled A Public Health Issue

Massive black hole
NASASci/Health

The Super-Massive Mystery Of Super-Massive Black Holes

An Anthony's poison arrow frog sitting on a leaf
Rebecca TarvinSci/Health

How Do Poisonous And Venomous Animals Resist Their Own Toxins?

Bulldozer in front of sand mine
James Baker / CC By 2.0Sci/Health

Sand Wars: Illegal Mining Is Making One Natural Resource A Lot Rarer

Earth from space
NASASci/Health

If Aliens Exist, How Would They Find Earth?

NOAA's Gulfstream IV-SP flying into a hurricane
NOAASci/Health

These Planes Fly Into Hurricanes To Study Them

Up-close view of Jupiter's auroras at its north pole
G. Randy GladstoneSci/Health

NASA's Juno Might've Found Where Jupiter's Powerful Auroras Come From

Millions of galaxies
NASASci/Health

AI Can Do An Astronomer's Job 10 Million Times Faster

Garbage overflowing from trash can
Hans / CC0Sci/Health

Turning Trash Into Biofuel Might Not Be As Green As You Think

Graph comparing the number of members of Congress to those congressmen with STEM degrees.
NewsySci/Health

Should More Scientists Hold Public Office?

Babylonian clay tablet with mathematical trig formulas
University of New South WalesSci/Health

This Ancient Babylonian Tablet Dates Trigonometry Back 3,700 Years

Dead trees
William and Leander AndereggSci/Health

It's Getting Harder And Harder For Trees To Bounce Back From Drought

Full moon
NASASci/Health

Moon's Magnetic Field Lasted A Billion Years Longer Than We Thought