Study Estimates 17% Of Food-Allergic Kids Also Have Sesame Allergy

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Study Estimates 17% Of Food-Allergic Kids Also Have Sesame Allergy
​According to a new National Institutes of Health study, an estimated 17% of kids with other food allergies are also allergic to sesame.
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Researchers at the National Institutes of Health have found that sesame allergy is common among children with other food allergies.

According to a study published last week in the journal Pediatric Allergy and Immunology, an estimated 17% of kids with other food allergies are also allergic to sesame. Researchers say they developed a model to predict the probability of a sesame allergy in children by measuring the amount of a certain antibody in their blood.

Sesame is one of the most common food allergies, and recent studies estimate that more than 1 million Americans have that allergy. Allergic reactions can vary from mild symptoms like hives to severe symptoms like whole-body anaphylaxis. Sesame is not one of the allergens that manufacturers are legally required to disclose on food labels — like peanuts, wheat and milk — but the FDA is considering adding sesame to the list amid growing concern.