North Carolina Senate Race Is Neck And Neck

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North Carolina Senate Race Is Neck And Neck
Democrat and former Chief Justice of the North Carolina Supreme Court Cheri Beasley is hoping to win voters against her GOP challenger Ted Budd.

With 2 million early voters already casting their ballots in the Tar Heel State, two Senate hopefuls are tightening their laces as they head into Election Day. Democrat and former Chief Justice of the North Carolina Supreme Court Cheri Beasley is hoping to win voters' hearts and minds against her challenger Republican Congressman and gun store owner Ted Budd. They only have hours left on the campaign trail, and both campaigns have a full schedule Monday with plenty of stops to make. 

According to the independent, nonprofit think tank John Locke Foundation, Beasley has outspent her Republican challenger.

But North Carolina has favored sending Republicans to Congress, and Budd could end up being the choice for voters more concerned about the economy than abortion rights.  

"The Dobbs decision did impact a lot of voters, and it was something Democrats were running very heavily into the late summer and early fall. Now polling seems to indicate that that issue isn’t as prevalent at this point right now with voters. By and large, the No. 1 issue is the economy and inflation," said Jim Stirling, a research fellow at the John Locke Foundation. 

North Carolina voters have their opinions too. 

"I feel like she's just an even-handed person that belongs in the deliberative body of Congress," said Nick Woomer-Deters, a North Carolina voter. 

Another voter Newsy talked to said he already voted for Budd.

"I love capitalism, I love the American way. Our economy is not in good shape right now, and I believe he has a better understanding than she on the things that need to be done. I really do believe that's the No. 1 issue, and believe it or not, crime is the No. 2 issue," said Dennis Berwyn, a North Carolina voter. 

Other battles noteworthy in North Carolina include several school board races that reflect a growing national divide over education.