Experts Warn of Super Bowl Sunday Parties As COVID-19 Variants Spread

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Experts Warn of Super Bowl Sunday Parties As COVID-19 Variants Spread
Experts warn Super Bowl parties could be super spreaders unless gatherings are kept to household members.
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With infections spiking from a new COVID-19 variant, health experts are urging caution so that Super Bowl parties don't become super spreaders. 

The U.S. now has nearly 27 million cases and more than 450,000 deaths, leading the world in both categories according to Johns Hopkins University. 

And this year's big game day comes as the CDC reports more than 600 infections related to new COVID-19 mutations in the U.S., U.K, Brazil and South Africa. Health officials are urging Americans to limit Super Bowl parties to household members - instead of inviting friends and neighbors.

"People will get together, and in some cities, if you got 25 people together for Super Bowl Sunday in a party, the chances of having one person with Covid among those individuals, it depends on the city, but in some cities like LA, its over 50%," said Dr. Carlos del Rio of the Emory School of Medicine.

Dr. Anthony Fauci says avoiding such gatherings and getting vaccinated as soon as possible are keys to avoiding a surge in cases from new virus variants. 

“Viruses will not evolve and mutate if you do not give them an open playing field to replicate and replicate in an unbridled fashion," Dr. Fauci said.

President Biden wants 1.5 million Americans to be vaccinated per day, a goal yet to be reached. But distribution efforts and accessibility are on the rise. States like New York and Texas are looking at increasing vaccine availability in under-served and vulnerable communities. 

The president is also hoping his proposed $1.9 trillion relief package will provide funding to accelerate vaccination efforts. The bill would also provide financial support for reopening schools, with the CDC set to release school safety guidance this week. But Democrats may have to pass the legislation on their own, with little or no Republican support.