Image: Business Insider


BY JASMINE BAILEY


For 150 years - we’ve known it was out there.
But until now, no one had actually seen a Spade-Toothed Beaked Whale.
KSWB reports.

“Two whales that washed up on a beach in New Zealand have been identified as species never seen before. This is a Spade-Toothed Beaked Whale. They were first discovered way back in 1872.”


The mother and her male calf were stranded on a beach in Northern New Zealand in December 2010. The Register reports— initially, scientists thought the whales were common Gray’s beaked whales. But…


After a DNA analysis, scientists realized they were looking at two of the world’s rarest whales.


A writer for Discover magazine notes— telling the species apart is not easy.
“…Compared to the Gray’s beaked whale... the female spade-toothed whale had a more prominent forehead, a white belly, dark flippers, a dark eye-patch, and a blackish-gray beak (the Gray’s beak, confusingly, is white).”

 

Before this discovery, scientists had little evidence to prove the Spade-Toothed species even existed. According to The Telegraph…


"Bone fragments found on a remote Pacific island in 1872 originally proved the existence of the then-unknown species. Two partial skulls found in New Zealand in the 1950s and Chile in 1986 were the only signs of the creatures’ continued existence."


Researchers aren’t sure why the whales remain so elusive. A marine biologist tells Our Amazing Planet...


“It may be that they are simply an offshore species that lives and dies in the deep ocean waters and only rarely wash[es] ashore…”


Spade-toothed beaked whales live in the South Pacific Ocean and spend their time in deep water looking for squid and small fish.
 

World's Rarest Whale 'Rediscovered' in New Zealand

by Jasmine Bailey
0
Transcript
Nov 6, 2012

World's Rarest Whale 'Rediscovered' in New Zealand

 

Image: Business Insider


BY JASMINE BAILEY


For 150 years - we’ve known it was out there.
But until now, no one had actually seen a Spade-Toothed Beaked Whale.
KSWB reports.

“Two whales that washed up on a beach in New Zealand have been identified as species never seen before. This is a Spade-Toothed Beaked Whale. They were first discovered way back in 1872.”


The mother and her male calf were stranded on a beach in Northern New Zealand in December 2010. The Register reports— initially, scientists thought the whales were common Gray’s beaked whales. But…


After a DNA analysis, scientists realized they were looking at two of the world’s rarest whales.


A writer for Discover magazine notes— telling the species apart is not easy.
“…Compared to the Gray’s beaked whale... the female spade-toothed whale had a more prominent forehead, a white belly, dark flippers, a dark eye-patch, and a blackish-gray beak (the Gray’s beak, confusingly, is white).”

 

Before this discovery, scientists had little evidence to prove the Spade-Toothed species even existed. According to The Telegraph…


"Bone fragments found on a remote Pacific island in 1872 originally proved the existence of the then-unknown species. Two partial skulls found in New Zealand in the 1950s and Chile in 1986 were the only signs of the creatures’ continued existence."


Researchers aren’t sure why the whales remain so elusive. A marine biologist tells Our Amazing Planet...


“It may be that they are simply an offshore species that lives and dies in the deep ocean waters and only rarely wash[es] ashore…”


Spade-toothed beaked whales live in the South Pacific Ocean and spend their time in deep water looking for squid and small fish.
 

View More
Comments
Newsy
www3