Image source: The New York Times

 

BY CHRiSTINA HARTMAN

 

The presidential race has snagged much of the pre-election day spotlight — but there’s also the balance of power in Congress at stake Tuesday. Which, as we learned in 2010, can really shake things up in Washington.

ABC: “Republicans won control of the House in 2010, riding a wave of victories by Tea Party-backed candidates carrying a message of fiscal conservatism and strong opposition to ‘Obamacare.’”

Right now — Republicans have the majority in the House.

And according to New York Times analysis — 81 House seats are in play — with 25 leaning Democratic, 32 leaning Republican, and 24 a toss-up.

Giving Republicans — who already have a sizeable head start — the advantage for keeping their House majority. And keep in mind congressional map redistricting after the 2010 census. Roll Call’s Shira Toeplitz says it favored Republicans.

VIA NBC, ROLL CALL’S SHIRA TOEPLITZ: “For the most part Republicans, because they made such overwhelming gains not only in Congress, but in states, they were able to control redistricting in a lot of key states.”

But in the Senate — Democrats currently have the majority.

And Times analysis suggests they’re favored to keep it. Of 18 Senate seats most in play — 7 lean Democratic and 3 Republican — with 8 a toss-up.

Among the Senate tossups are Missouri’s Democratic incumbent Claire McCaskill — who’s locked in a close race with Republican challenger Todd Akin.

Akin was favored to win before now-infamous “legitimate rape” comments to a local TV station.

Another closely-watched Senate race — Massachusetts. Republican incumbent Scott Brown is locked in a very tight race against Democrat Elizabeth Warren. (VIDEO VIA WCVB)

Montana, Maine, Indiana, Virginia, Wisconsin and Nevada could also see a party switch, but no matter how they swing, neither party is projected to win a super-majority — which means more gridlock is likely.

 

Will The Balance of Power Change Much in House, Senate?

by Christina Hartman
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Transcript
Nov 5, 2012

Will The Balance of Power Change Much in House, Senate?

Image source: The New York Times

 

BY CHRiSTINA HARTMAN

 

The presidential race has snagged much of the pre-election day spotlight — but there’s also the balance of power in Congress at stake Tuesday. Which, as we learned in 2010, can really shake things up in Washington.

ABC: “Republicans won control of the House in 2010, riding a wave of victories by Tea Party-backed candidates carrying a message of fiscal conservatism and strong opposition to ‘Obamacare.’”

Right now — Republicans have the majority in the House.

And according to New York Times analysis — 81 House seats are in play — with 25 leaning Democratic, 32 leaning Republican, and 24 a toss-up.

Giving Republicans — who already have a sizeable head start — the advantage for keeping their House majority. And keep in mind congressional map redistricting after the 2010 census. Roll Call’s Shira Toeplitz says it favored Republicans.

VIA NBC, ROLL CALL’S SHIRA TOEPLITZ: “For the most part Republicans, because they made such overwhelming gains not only in Congress, but in states, they were able to control redistricting in a lot of key states.”

But in the Senate — Democrats currently have the majority.

And Times analysis suggests they’re favored to keep it. Of 18 Senate seats most in play — 7 lean Democratic and 3 Republican — with 8 a toss-up.

Among the Senate tossups are Missouri’s Democratic incumbent Claire McCaskill — who’s locked in a close race with Republican challenger Todd Akin.

Akin was favored to win before now-infamous “legitimate rape” comments to a local TV station.

Another closely-watched Senate race — Massachusetts. Republican incumbent Scott Brown is locked in a very tight race against Democrat Elizabeth Warren. (VIDEO VIA WCVB)

Montana, Maine, Indiana, Virginia, Wisconsin and Nevada could also see a party switch, but no matter how they swing, neither party is projected to win a super-majority — which means more gridlock is likely.

 

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