(Image Source: Whitehouse.org)

BY JOHN O’CONNOR

ANCHOR NATHAN BYRNE 

As U.S. Senators debate the budget for the annual defense authorization bill, the White House has issued its first veto threat since President Barack Obama’s re-election.

“[The] White House is complaining about provisions to restrict the administration’s ability to transfer detainees at Guantanamo Bay. It also complained about the prohibition to build a detention facility in the U.S.”

The White House warns the National Defense Authorization Act of 2013 deviates from the president’s budget request, trespasses on his power and limits his ability to pursue the administration’s current defense strategy. 

Politico notes the White House’s major rejection is over section 1031, which restricts the president’s ability to transfer prisoners from Guantanamo Bay to foreign countries.  

A statement of administration policy says section 1031 … “interferes with the executive’s ability to make important foreign policy and national security determinations and would in certain circumstances violate constitutional separation of powers principles.” 

The Huffington Post explains civil liberties advocates and many U.S. allies say suspects should be able to be brought to the U.S. and tried in the civilian courts there …

“ … but many remain disappointed that Obama did not veto last year's [National Defense Authorization Act], which codified the right of the executive to hold any terrorism suspect in military custody without trial. Obama signed it into law, but pledged not to detain anyone caught in the United States indefinitely.”  

The New York Daily News explains“Congress - including a Democrat-run Senate - has stymied Obama’s 2008 campaign pledge to shut down [Guantanamo Bay], which holds 166 suspected terrorists and insurgents … In the run-up to his reelection, Obama indicated he wasn't done fighting to shut down the post-9/11 prison … ” 

The Wall Street Journal reports there are a number of other provisions President Obama’s administration rejects — including restrictions on getting rid of unwanted planes, cuts to the civilian military workforce, and a measure that undoes some cost savings for military health care. 

White House Threatens to Veto Annual Defense Bill

by John O'Connor
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Transcript
Nov 30, 2012

White House Threatens to Veto Annual Defense Bill

 

(Image Source: Whitehouse.org)

BY JOHN O’CONNOR

ANCHOR NATHAN BYRNE 

As U.S. Senators debate the budget for the annual defense authorization bill, the White House has issued its first veto threat since President Barack Obama’s re-election.

“[The] White House is complaining about provisions to restrict the administration’s ability to transfer detainees at Guantanamo Bay. It also complained about the prohibition to build a detention facility in the U.S.”

The White House warns the National Defense Authorization Act of 2013 deviates from the president’s budget request, trespasses on his power and limits his ability to pursue the administration’s current defense strategy. 

Politico notes the White House’s major rejection is over section 1031, which restricts the president’s ability to transfer prisoners from Guantanamo Bay to foreign countries.  

A statement of administration policy says section 1031 … “interferes with the executive’s ability to make important foreign policy and national security determinations and would in certain circumstances violate constitutional separation of powers principles.” 

The Huffington Post explains civil liberties advocates and many U.S. allies say suspects should be able to be brought to the U.S. and tried in the civilian courts there …

“ … but many remain disappointed that Obama did not veto last year's [National Defense Authorization Act], which codified the right of the executive to hold any terrorism suspect in military custody without trial. Obama signed it into law, but pledged not to detain anyone caught in the United States indefinitely.”  

The New York Daily News explains“Congress - including a Democrat-run Senate - has stymied Obama’s 2008 campaign pledge to shut down [Guantanamo Bay], which holds 166 suspected terrorists and insurgents … In the run-up to his reelection, Obama indicated he wasn't done fighting to shut down the post-9/11 prison … ” 

The Wall Street Journal reports there are a number of other provisions President Obama’s administration rejects — including restrictions on getting rid of unwanted planes, cuts to the civilian military workforce, and a measure that undoes some cost savings for military health care. 

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