(Thumbnail Image: Wikipedia Commons)

 

The White House got defensive Thursday about one of the frontrunners for its nomination to the Supreme Court — not about her record, but about her sexual orientation.

 

A CBS News blog named the administration’s current Solicitor General Elena Kagan as the most likely nominee in part because she would “please” administration supporters as “the first openly gay justice.” The Obama administration fired back at CBS, saying Kagan is not a lesbian. CBS initially defended the post, but eventually took it down.

 

The author of the post is Ben Domenech, a blogger with a conservative track record, and a former Bush administration aide. That’s led some gay rights groups to accuse Republicans of spreading gossip to derail Kagan’s nomination.

 

Human Rights Campaign spokesman Michael Cole told the Huffington Post:

 

"[It’s] straight out of the right-wing playbook… Even though the majority of Americans couldn't care less about a nominee's sexual orientation, the far right will continue to be shameless with their whisper campaigns to drum up their base and raise money off of prejudice.”
 
But for his part, the blogger who wrote the post apologized, admitting apparently he’d heard wrong about Kagan’s sexuality. Ben Domenech wrote:

 

“Look, it’s 2010 — no one should care if a nominee to any position is gay.  Senators should look at things that actually matter..." [The New Ledger]

Missing in the conversation is Kagan herself — who hasn’t made any comment to the press about the blog post or the White House’s response. A blogger for the website LezGetReal.com says Kagan needs to change that — and fast:

“If she is not a lesbian, she needs to come out and say it... If she is gay, I believe she needs to say that too, and quickly. While being gay is not a shameful thing, being chased out of the closet can certainly make a person appear weak and lacking in integrity.”

Rumors aside, this dustup might offer some clues about whom the administration might nominate for the Supreme Court post. Some bloggers suggested the White House’s defense of Kagan hints she’s likely to be tapped for the nomination. On MSNBC, a former Obama administration official said diversity is important in the nomination process.
 
“Having diversity in a room in a meeting on the Court is an important thing for American society, because we are a diverse society and people bring not just their legal qualities, but themselves to this Court.”

 

The president is expected to nominate his replacement for retiring Supreme Court Justice John Paul Stevens by late May.

White House Defends Potential Court Nominee

by
0
Transcript
Apr 18, 2010

White House Defends Potential Court Nominee

(Thumbnail Image: Wikipedia Commons)

 

The White House got defensive Thursday about one of the frontrunners for its nomination to the Supreme Court — not about her record, but about her sexual orientation.

 

A CBS News blog named the administration’s current Solicitor General Elena Kagan as the most likely nominee in part because she would “please” administration supporters as “the first openly gay justice.” The Obama administration fired back at CBS, saying Kagan is not a lesbian. CBS initially defended the post, but eventually took it down.

 

The author of the post is Ben Domenech, a blogger with a conservative track record, and a former Bush administration aide. That’s led some gay rights groups to accuse Republicans of spreading gossip to derail Kagan’s nomination.

 

Human Rights Campaign spokesman Michael Cole told the Huffington Post:

 

"[It’s] straight out of the right-wing playbook… Even though the majority of Americans couldn't care less about a nominee's sexual orientation, the far right will continue to be shameless with their whisper campaigns to drum up their base and raise money off of prejudice.”
 
But for his part, the blogger who wrote the post apologized, admitting apparently he’d heard wrong about Kagan’s sexuality. Ben Domenech wrote:

 

“Look, it’s 2010 — no one should care if a nominee to any position is gay.  Senators should look at things that actually matter..." [The New Ledger]

Missing in the conversation is Kagan herself — who hasn’t made any comment to the press about the blog post or the White House’s response. A blogger for the website LezGetReal.com says Kagan needs to change that — and fast:

“If she is not a lesbian, she needs to come out and say it... If she is gay, I believe she needs to say that too, and quickly. While being gay is not a shameful thing, being chased out of the closet can certainly make a person appear weak and lacking in integrity.”

Rumors aside, this dustup might offer some clues about whom the administration might nominate for the Supreme Court post. Some bloggers suggested the White House’s defense of Kagan hints she’s likely to be tapped for the nomination. On MSNBC, a former Obama administration official said diversity is important in the nomination process.
 
“Having diversity in a room in a meeting on the Court is an important thing for American society, because we are a diverse society and people bring not just their legal qualities, but themselves to this Court.”

 

The president is expected to nominate his replacement for retiring Supreme Court Justice John Paul Stevens by late May.

View More
Comments
Newsy
www1