(Image source: Planet Ware



BY ALANA YOUNG

ANCHOR JENNY MECKLES

 

You're watching multisource politics news analysis from Newsy

 

 

Government shutdown. You might have heard these two words a lot lately on the evening news -- but what does it actually mean? After months of negotiations - six temporary funding measures - and a shutdown looming again, lawmakers have been quick to start - and continue - the blame-game.

 

REP. PAUL RYAN (R-WI), CBN: “Up here in Washington, we have no partners to negotiate with. The other side of the aisle is just choosing to walk away from this fight.”

REP. CHRIS VAN HOLLEN (D-MD), CNN: “What you have right now is the Tea Party wing of the Republican Party in the House saying, it’s our way or a shutdown.”

REP. TIM GRIFFIN (R-AR), FOX NEWS: “You see a bill that came out of the House, you see nothing from these guys. It’s a charade. They’re acting like they’re in good faith..."

REP. KAREN BASS (D-CA), MSNBC:... “...will the Republican leadership act in a responsible manner and fund the government until the end of the year? …. we need to stop the silliness frankly.”

 

But the public isn’t buying into the finger-pointing, and a recent Pew poll shows people are divided on whether the Republicans - at 39 percent - or the Obama administration - at 36 percent -- will be at fault for a government shutdown.

 

If the shutdown does happen, it wouldn’t be the first time. The federal government shut down on four other occasions in history -- most recently a 21-day shutdown in December of 1995. But what would happen this time?

CNN: “If it happens this time around, it's U.S. troops we're talking about, including those fighting in Iraq, in Afghanistan, who could see their paychecks interrupted. Tax returns could be stalled if you haven’t filed yet. And for federal workers, during the two government shutdowns in the 1990s, hundreds of thousands of them were sent home. That's what this all means.”

 

In 2008, the non-partisan Congressional Research Service outlined the effects government shutdowns have on the economy. But in an interview on MSNBC, correspondent Dan Stone says a shutdown is not as bad as it sounds.

 

DAN STONE: “...A good way to put it is about half of the government shuts down. One of the key differences here, is that OMB is going to make the determinations about what is essential and what's not... The social security checks will still be going out, but the people who answer the calls from people who have questions about their social security checks will probably not be considered essential, at least for the week or two of a shutdown that's looming here. ... What isn't going to operate right now it looks like anything related to tourism is going to be taking a hit here. We're talking about museums, parks, national monuments, Visa and passport applications."

 

And Fox News contributor Andrea Tantaros agrees - shutdown affects with be minimal -- and says, “Bring on the shutdown."

ANDREA TANTAROS: “I don't think a lot happens. I mean, we talked about this. Unless you want to go to a national park, not a lot is gonna happen. People will continue to get their checks. The post office is self funded so you will still go to the post office. Nothing major. It might take a short hit on consumer confidence. You look back, what happened during the Clinton shutdown. Not a lot.”

 

But a writer for PBS says people are forgetting - there are slight differences between 1995 and now -- namely several federal organizations that weren’t around before -- like the Department of Homeland Security and the Transportation Security Administration.

 

A House rule requires legislation be made public 3-days before a vote. That means Congress has until Wednesday afternoon to find a budget solution before the current resolution expires midnight Friday. 

 

 

 

Follow @Newsy_Videos on Twitter

Get more multisource video news analysis from Newsy
 

What Would a 'Government Shutdown' Really Mean?

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Apr 6, 2011

What Would a 'Government Shutdown' Really Mean?

(Image source: Planet Ware



BY ALANA YOUNG

ANCHOR JENNY MECKLES

 

You're watching multisource politics news analysis from Newsy

 

 

Government shutdown. You might have heard these two words a lot lately on the evening news -- but what does it actually mean? After months of negotiations - six temporary funding measures - and a shutdown looming again, lawmakers have been quick to start - and continue - the blame-game.

 

REP. PAUL RYAN (R-WI), CBN: “Up here in Washington, we have no partners to negotiate with. The other side of the aisle is just choosing to walk away from this fight.”

REP. CHRIS VAN HOLLEN (D-MD), CNN: “What you have right now is the Tea Party wing of the Republican Party in the House saying, it’s our way or a shutdown.”

REP. TIM GRIFFIN (R-AR), FOX NEWS: “You see a bill that came out of the House, you see nothing from these guys. It’s a charade. They’re acting like they’re in good faith..."

REP. KAREN BASS (D-CA), MSNBC:... “...will the Republican leadership act in a responsible manner and fund the government until the end of the year? …. we need to stop the silliness frankly.”

 

But the public isn’t buying into the finger-pointing, and a recent Pew poll shows people are divided on whether the Republicans - at 39 percent - or the Obama administration - at 36 percent -- will be at fault for a government shutdown.

 

If the shutdown does happen, it wouldn’t be the first time. The federal government shut down on four other occasions in history -- most recently a 21-day shutdown in December of 1995. But what would happen this time?

CNN: “If it happens this time around, it's U.S. troops we're talking about, including those fighting in Iraq, in Afghanistan, who could see their paychecks interrupted. Tax returns could be stalled if you haven’t filed yet. And for federal workers, during the two government shutdowns in the 1990s, hundreds of thousands of them were sent home. That's what this all means.”

 

In 2008, the non-partisan Congressional Research Service outlined the effects government shutdowns have on the economy. But in an interview on MSNBC, correspondent Dan Stone says a shutdown is not as bad as it sounds.

 

DAN STONE: “...A good way to put it is about half of the government shuts down. One of the key differences here, is that OMB is going to make the determinations about what is essential and what's not... The social security checks will still be going out, but the people who answer the calls from people who have questions about their social security checks will probably not be considered essential, at least for the week or two of a shutdown that's looming here. ... What isn't going to operate right now it looks like anything related to tourism is going to be taking a hit here. We're talking about museums, parks, national monuments, Visa and passport applications."

 

And Fox News contributor Andrea Tantaros agrees - shutdown affects with be minimal -- and says, “Bring on the shutdown."

ANDREA TANTAROS: “I don't think a lot happens. I mean, we talked about this. Unless you want to go to a national park, not a lot is gonna happen. People will continue to get their checks. The post office is self funded so you will still go to the post office. Nothing major. It might take a short hit on consumer confidence. You look back, what happened during the Clinton shutdown. Not a lot.”

 

But a writer for PBS says people are forgetting - there are slight differences between 1995 and now -- namely several federal organizations that weren’t around before -- like the Department of Homeland Security and the Transportation Security Administration.

 

A House rule requires legislation be made public 3-days before a vote. That means Congress has until Wednesday afternoon to find a budget solution before the current resolution expires midnight Friday. 

 

 

 

Follow @Newsy_Videos on Twitter

Get more multisource video news analysis from Newsy
 

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