(Image source: The New York Times)

 

 

BY ZACH TOOMBS

 

 

He’s got an estimated $500 million in the bank, some valuable connections and a lot of free time on his hands. The next step for former Republican presidential nominee Mitt Romney is anyone’s guess.

 

Forbes looks to the post-election lives of past losing candidates. But, it notes, that unlike John McCain...

 

...and John Kerry, Romney doesn’t have a spot in the Senate to fall back to.

 

It’s tough to imagine him as a global crusader for environmental rights like Al Gore.

 

And he certainly won’t need to pay the bills by endorsing products in TV commercials, like Bob Dole.

 

“My faithful little blue friend. An ice cold Pepsi Cola.”

 

Instead, Forbes suggests Romney should use his experience as a CEO to:


“... fund and run a foundation dedicated to fostering and researching new, innovative right-of-center policy ideas.”

 

But, as a failed candidate who never really charmed the core right wing of his party, Romney’s status as a GOP elder is in doubt. On CNN, former House Speaker Newt Gingrich said though Romney has pull with Republicans, he still should step aside for a new crop of conservatives.

 

“I think Mitt’s got to decide what he wants to do. I think clearly he is major figure in the party, he can play a significant role in the party. I think 2016 is probably the next generation.”

 

Speculation aside, the one man at the center of this who doesn’t seem to have a plan for Mitt Romney is … Mitt Romney himself. Though his senior campaign adviser Eric Fehrnstrom told RealClearPolitics his immediate plans are purely family-centered.

 

"I think he wants to spend a lot of time with his grandkids. There was one point in the night when the results were still coming in, and he turned off the TV to play with his grandkids."

 

Of course, Romney could always go the usual route for retired politicians and aim for the best-seller list.

 

The Week magazine writes:

 

“If he decides he wants to write a book about his months touring the country, he's got plenty of notebooks he filled during quiet moments on the campaign trail...”

 

Yet another option: jumping back into the private sector. After all, Romney’s fond of saying he’s a businessman, not a lawmaker.

 

What’s Next for Romney?

by Zach Toombs
0
Transcript
Nov 7, 2012

What’s Next for Romney?

 

(Image source: The New York Times)

 

 

BY ZACH TOOMBS

 

 

He’s got an estimated $500 million in the bank, some valuable connections and a lot of free time on his hands. The next step for former Republican presidential nominee Mitt Romney is anyone’s guess.

 

Forbes looks to the post-election lives of past losing candidates. But, it notes, that unlike John McCain...

 

...and John Kerry, Romney doesn’t have a spot in the Senate to fall back to.

 

It’s tough to imagine him as a global crusader for environmental rights like Al Gore.

 

And he certainly won’t need to pay the bills by endorsing products in TV commercials, like Bob Dole.

 

“My faithful little blue friend. An ice cold Pepsi Cola.”

 

Instead, Forbes suggests Romney should use his experience as a CEO to:


“... fund and run a foundation dedicated to fostering and researching new, innovative right-of-center policy ideas.”

 

But, as a failed candidate who never really charmed the core right wing of his party, Romney’s status as a GOP elder is in doubt. On CNN, former House Speaker Newt Gingrich said though Romney has pull with Republicans, he still should step aside for a new crop of conservatives.

 

“I think Mitt’s got to decide what he wants to do. I think clearly he is major figure in the party, he can play a significant role in the party. I think 2016 is probably the next generation.”

 

Speculation aside, the one man at the center of this who doesn’t seem to have a plan for Mitt Romney is … Mitt Romney himself. Though his senior campaign adviser Eric Fehrnstrom told RealClearPolitics his immediate plans are purely family-centered.

 

"I think he wants to spend a lot of time with his grandkids. There was one point in the night when the results were still coming in, and he turned off the TV to play with his grandkids."

 

Of course, Romney could always go the usual route for retired politicians and aim for the best-seller list.

 

The Week magazine writes:

 

“If he decides he wants to write a book about his months touring the country, he's got plenty of notebooks he filled during quiet moments on the campaign trail...”

 

Yet another option: jumping back into the private sector. After all, Romney’s fond of saying he’s a businessman, not a lawmaker.

 

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