(Image Source: The New York Times)

 

BY DAVID EARL

ANCHOR CHRISTINA HARTMAN

 

You couldn’t talk about politics during the 2010 election without mentioning tea. The grassroots Tea Party movement claimed candidates … who won elections, and even created their own caucuses in Congress. But, as the 2012 cycle heats up, has the tea gone cold? NPR has reflections from a New York Times reporter.

 

“The Tea Party was always going to be a phenomenon of a midterm elections ... and when you have smaller voter turnout a group like the Tea Party can have more of an influence.”

The headlines agree. The Tea Party hasn’t been as big a force this election cycle. But don’t tell that to Rick Santelli. The man who some credit with the start of the Tea Party movement after a TV rant … has another rant ready … this time for CNBC.

“While the vandals are on the street corners, the Tea Party Conservatives? They’re working the state houses, the governorships, the mayorships, the Senate, the House.”

So according to Santelli, the Tea Party is largely silent because it did its job. It got its candidates into the halls of power. But the Daily Beast says while there aren’t the massive rallies of 2010, the Tea Party is still a part of the 2012 campaign conversation.

“...while the Tea Parties may not be dictating who the candidate is this year, they certainly have dictated the issues the candidates are talking about and what they are saying, particularly in the area of fiscal restraint, free-market capitalism, and the virtues of the Tea Party’s favorite historical document, the U.S. Constitution.”

And the Tea Party’s lack of active participation in picking a candidate this election cycle might be on purpose. On the topic of candidates, Tea Party leader Mark Meckler tells the Daily Caller ...

“‘Nobody’s thrilled. … I’m not seeing any sort of consensus around any of the candidates because I don’t think anybody’s entirely satisfied,’ he said. Asked to name leaders that tea partiers wished would have run, Meckler mentioned Indiana Rep. Mike Pence, Louisiana Gov. Bobby Jindal, Indiana Gov. Mitch Daniels and New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie.”

But a Tea Party member tells WTSP in Tampa the thing about the party is … well … it’s NOT a party.

“We’re not a national party, we’re a national movement.”

What Happened to the Tea Party?

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Feb 15, 2012

What Happened to the Tea Party?

(Image Source: The New York Times)

 

BY DAVID EARL

ANCHOR CHRISTINA HARTMAN

 

You couldn’t talk about politics during the 2010 election without mentioning tea. The grassroots Tea Party movement claimed candidates … who won elections, and even created their own caucuses in Congress. But, as the 2012 cycle heats up, has the tea gone cold? NPR has reflections from a New York Times reporter.

 

“The Tea Party was always going to be a phenomenon of a midterm elections ... and when you have smaller voter turnout a group like the Tea Party can have more of an influence.”

The headlines agree. The Tea Party hasn’t been as big a force this election cycle. But don’t tell that to Rick Santelli. The man who some credit with the start of the Tea Party movement after a TV rant … has another rant ready … this time for CNBC.

“While the vandals are on the street corners, the Tea Party Conservatives? They’re working the state houses, the governorships, the mayorships, the Senate, the House.”

So according to Santelli, the Tea Party is largely silent because it did its job. It got its candidates into the halls of power. But the Daily Beast says while there aren’t the massive rallies of 2010, the Tea Party is still a part of the 2012 campaign conversation.

“...while the Tea Parties may not be dictating who the candidate is this year, they certainly have dictated the issues the candidates are talking about and what they are saying, particularly in the area of fiscal restraint, free-market capitalism, and the virtues of the Tea Party’s favorite historical document, the U.S. Constitution.”

And the Tea Party’s lack of active participation in picking a candidate this election cycle might be on purpose. On the topic of candidates, Tea Party leader Mark Meckler tells the Daily Caller ...

“‘Nobody’s thrilled. … I’m not seeing any sort of consensus around any of the candidates because I don’t think anybody’s entirely satisfied,’ he said. Asked to name leaders that tea partiers wished would have run, Meckler mentioned Indiana Rep. Mike Pence, Louisiana Gov. Bobby Jindal, Indiana Gov. Mitch Daniels and New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie.”

But a Tea Party member tells WTSP in Tampa the thing about the party is … well … it’s NOT a party.

“We’re not a national party, we’re a national movement.”

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