(Image source: Red Alert Politics)

BY JOHN O’CONNOR AND CHRISTINA HARTMAN

After major losses in the Senate and the ultimate loss for Republican presidential candidate Mitt Romney, where does the GOP go from here?  

Morning-after headlines read like pre-bituaries for the party’s future.

VIA CNN: “The question is whether the Republican leadership continue to embrace intransigence, or whether they will feel that their own legacies — as well as the good of the country — requires reaching out and finding common ground.”

And there’s talk of a demographic problem. In battleground Wisconsin alone, President Obama won 94
percent of the black vote and 57 percent of the female vote.

VIA CNBC: “...election after election where large portions of a changing demographic are given to the Democrats some say for free...”

Tuesday night the Tea Party released a statement essentially blaming the weakness of the party’s presidential nominee Mitt Romney — who the more conservative wing of the party criticized as too moderate.

But South Carolina Republican Lindsey Graham appeared to refute that in an interview with Politico, saying:

“We’re not losing 95 percent of African-Americans and two-thirds of Hispanics and voters under 30 because we’re not being hard-ass enough.”

Mitt Romney DID win the white vote — with The Nation’s Jon Wiener reporting he won 4 percent more of the white vote than John McCain in 2008.

But he didn’t win ANY of the major battleground states, which The Economist notes raises questions about whether the demographic can realistically win Republicans a future presidential election.

It wasn’t just on the presidential level.

In a few states, social liberals also saw victories in ballot initiatives to legalize same-sex marriage and recreational use of marijuana.

Jonathan Tobin of the conservative Commentary Magazine says — yes the GOP might have underestimated the Democrats’ sway with the electorate BUT...

“The big mistake most political analysts tend to make is to assume that the political landscape of one election will be much the same in future contests.”

What Happened to the GOP?

by Christina Hartman, John O'Connor
0
Transcript
Nov 7, 2012

What Happened to the GOP?

(Image source: Red Alert Politics)

BY JOHN O’CONNOR AND CHRISTINA HARTMAN

After major losses in the Senate and the ultimate loss for Republican presidential candidate Mitt Romney, where does the GOP go from here?  

Morning-after headlines read like pre-bituaries for the party’s future.

VIA CNN: “The question is whether the Republican leadership continue to embrace intransigence, or whether they will feel that their own legacies — as well as the good of the country — requires reaching out and finding common ground.”

And there’s talk of a demographic problem. In battleground Wisconsin alone, President Obama won 94
percent of the black vote and 57 percent of the female vote.

VIA CNBC: “...election after election where large portions of a changing demographic are given to the Democrats some say for free...”

Tuesday night the Tea Party released a statement essentially blaming the weakness of the party’s presidential nominee Mitt Romney — who the more conservative wing of the party criticized as too moderate.

But South Carolina Republican Lindsey Graham appeared to refute that in an interview with Politico, saying:

“We’re not losing 95 percent of African-Americans and two-thirds of Hispanics and voters under 30 because we’re not being hard-ass enough.”

Mitt Romney DID win the white vote — with The Nation’s Jon Wiener reporting he won 4 percent more of the white vote than John McCain in 2008.

But he didn’t win ANY of the major battleground states, which The Economist notes raises questions about whether the demographic can realistically win Republicans a future presidential election.

It wasn’t just on the presidential level.

In a few states, social liberals also saw victories in ballot initiatives to legalize same-sex marriage and recreational use of marijuana.

Jonathan Tobin of the conservative Commentary Magazine says — yes the GOP might have underestimated the Democrats’ sway with the electorate BUT...

“The big mistake most political analysts tend to make is to assume that the political landscape of one election will be much the same in future contests.”

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