Image Source: Wikimedia Commons

BY JEREMY TRUITT



Just three days after voters passed ballot measures legalizing recreational marijuana use in Colorado and Washington, officials in Washington are moving to stop enforcement of marijuana laws. The Pierce County prosecutor told the The Seattle Times...

"The people have spoken through this initiative, and as a practical matter, I don't think you could sell a simple marijuana case to a jury after this initiative passed."

Prosecutors in Pierce and King’s counties, the two largest counties in the state, have already moved to dismiss over 220 pending marijuana-related cases. In addition, the Sheriff’s office is ceasing the enforcement of existing marijuana laws in anticipation of the law taking effect.

The King’s County prosecutor told CNN “There is no point in continuing to seek criminal penalties for conduct that will be legal next month.” In response to the prosecutor’s decision, the Sheriff’s Office said its deputies “will not be directed to arrest or charge individuals caught with one ounce or less of marijuana.”

 

The dropped cases only apply to those aged 21 and older with charges of possessing one ounce or less at the time of arrest. The ballot initiative makes marijuana possession and use legal, and citizens can grow up to six plants but the law does not allow public use of the drug.

 

The ultimate fate of the law is still widely considered up in the air however, as Reuters reports the federal government will likely fight the states.

 

The U.S. Department of Justice still recognizes marijuana as an illegal drug likely to be misused, and said enforcement of the federal Controlled Substances Act, will remain unchanged

 

Salon offers a more pointed opinion, saying the police need to be separated from the marijuana users...  


“...except to clean up their messes, as we do with alcohol … Police arrest alcohol abusers who get in bar brawls...or drive drunk, but they leave well-behaved boozers alone. So it should be with marijuana.”

 

The governor of Colorado, who opposes the ballot initiative told The Daily Journal he plans to speak with U.S. Attorney General Eric Holder about how to move forward since the laws contradict federal regulations.

 

Assuming the laws are not blocked by the government, the Colorado law will take effect January 5. Commercial sales could even be seen as early as 2014.

 

 

Washington Counties Stopping Enforcement of Marijuana Laws

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Nov 10, 2012

Washington Counties Stopping Enforcement of Marijuana Laws

Image Source: Wikimedia Commons

BY JEREMY TRUITT



Just three days after voters passed ballot measures legalizing recreational marijuana use in Colorado and Washington, officials in Washington are moving to stop enforcement of marijuana laws. The Pierce County prosecutor told the The Seattle Times...

"The people have spoken through this initiative, and as a practical matter, I don't think you could sell a simple marijuana case to a jury after this initiative passed."

Prosecutors in Pierce and King’s counties, the two largest counties in the state, have already moved to dismiss over 220 pending marijuana-related cases. In addition, the Sheriff’s office is ceasing the enforcement of existing marijuana laws in anticipation of the law taking effect.

The King’s County prosecutor told CNN “There is no point in continuing to seek criminal penalties for conduct that will be legal next month.” In response to the prosecutor’s decision, the Sheriff’s Office said its deputies “will not be directed to arrest or charge individuals caught with one ounce or less of marijuana.”

 

The dropped cases only apply to those aged 21 and older with charges of possessing one ounce or less at the time of arrest. The ballot initiative makes marijuana possession and use legal, and citizens can grow up to six plants but the law does not allow public use of the drug.

 

The ultimate fate of the law is still widely considered up in the air however, as Reuters reports the federal government will likely fight the states.

 

The U.S. Department of Justice still recognizes marijuana as an illegal drug likely to be misused, and said enforcement of the federal Controlled Substances Act, will remain unchanged

 

Salon offers a more pointed opinion, saying the police need to be separated from the marijuana users...  


“...except to clean up their messes, as we do with alcohol … Police arrest alcohol abusers who get in bar brawls...or drive drunk, but they leave well-behaved boozers alone. So it should be with marijuana.”

 

The governor of Colorado, who opposes the ballot initiative told The Daily Journal he plans to speak with U.S. Attorney General Eric Holder about how to move forward since the laws contradict federal regulations.

 

Assuming the laws are not blocked by the government, the Colorado law will take effect January 5. Commercial sales could even be seen as early as 2014.

 

 

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