(Image source: Wikimedia Commons)

 

BY STACEY WELSH

 

ANCHOR MEGAN MURPHY

 

It seems Americans aren’t plugging into its latest electric car model, so General Motors is halting production of the Volt. Bloomberg reports demand is not keeping up with supply.

“GM will stop making Volts... from March 19 until April 23, Chris Lee, a company spokesman, said in an e-mail March 2... ‘This move is to keep proper inventory levels.’”

Just days before this announcement, President Obama told an auto workers conference that he wants to buy a Volt after he leaves office. A blogger for the Wall Street Journal projects the break in production will...

“...threaten President Obama’s stated goal of seeing a million electric cars in the U.S. by 2015. That goal assumed that the Volt would become the industry leader.”

So what’s behind the low sales? A GM executive blames a safety investigation into Volt batteries catching fire. An anchor for HLN agrees.

“Don’t jump to the conclusion that America isn’t ready for electric cars. It may be because there were some negative headlines lately about the Volt, surrounding its battery.”

But a reporter for WBZ says safety isn’t the issue — that low sales are no surprise because the Volt doesn’t run on its electric power long enough, and that at $40,000 or more — it’s too expensive.

“I hope GM’s finger-pointing isn’t a sign that they don’t know what they’re doing. Because a whole lot of workers and taxpayers would prefer to see them start getting it right.”

Slow Volt sales could also steer auto companies away from using electric cars to meet federal mileage standards. CBS reports, instead, companies are using other, new methods to save gas, like developing engines that shut off at traffic lights.

“The result has been a number of small cars that are rated for 40 MPG on the highway. With such choices, shoppers likely will remain reluctant to pay much more for the new, unfamiliar technology of plug-in electrics.”

About 1,300 employees are out of work at a Michigan factory during the production break.

Volt Production Halted: What's Next for Electric Cars?

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Mar 5, 2012

Volt Production Halted: What's Next for Electric Cars?

(Image source: Wikimedia Commons)

 

BY STACEY WELSH

 

ANCHOR MEGAN MURPHY

 

It seems Americans aren’t plugging into its latest electric car model, so General Motors is halting production of the Volt. Bloomberg reports demand is not keeping up with supply.

“GM will stop making Volts... from March 19 until April 23, Chris Lee, a company spokesman, said in an e-mail March 2... ‘This move is to keep proper inventory levels.’”

Just days before this announcement, President Obama told an auto workers conference that he wants to buy a Volt after he leaves office. A blogger for the Wall Street Journal projects the break in production will...

“...threaten President Obama’s stated goal of seeing a million electric cars in the U.S. by 2015. That goal assumed that the Volt would become the industry leader.”

So what’s behind the low sales? A GM executive blames a safety investigation into Volt batteries catching fire. An anchor for HLN agrees.

“Don’t jump to the conclusion that America isn’t ready for electric cars. It may be because there were some negative headlines lately about the Volt, surrounding its battery.”

But a reporter for WBZ says safety isn’t the issue — that low sales are no surprise because the Volt doesn’t run on its electric power long enough, and that at $40,000 or more — it’s too expensive.

“I hope GM’s finger-pointing isn’t a sign that they don’t know what they’re doing. Because a whole lot of workers and taxpayers would prefer to see them start getting it right.”

Slow Volt sales could also steer auto companies away from using electric cars to meet federal mileage standards. CBS reports, instead, companies are using other, new methods to save gas, like developing engines that shut off at traffic lights.

“The result has been a number of small cars that are rated for 40 MPG on the highway. With such choices, shoppers likely will remain reluctant to pay much more for the new, unfamiliar technology of plug-in electrics.”

About 1,300 employees are out of work at a Michigan factory during the production break.

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