Image Source: (LearnVest)


BY VANESSA MANCAO & ALEXANDRA OLGIN


“The Nobel Assembly at the Karolinska Institute decided to award the Nobel Prize in physiology or medicine 2010 to Robert Edwards for the development of In-Vitro fertilization.” (PBS)


But upon receiving the award, 85 year-old- professor Robert Edwards met some not-so-surprising resistance from a Vatican official.  The head of the Pontifical Academy for Life Ignacio Carrasco de Paula spoke out against the award, saying it ignored the ethical questions raised by the fertility treatment.


The Catholic News Service translated a written statement
de Paula made about Edwards’ recognition.

“...without Edwards there wouldn't be a market for oocytes (immature egg cells), without Edwards there wouldn't be freezers full of embryos waiting to be transferred [en]utero or, more likely, to be used for research or to die abandoned and forgotten by everyone."


And although the Vatican released a statement saying de Paula’s views are his own, it has a history of resistance against artificial insemination.  But an article in the Telegraph points to changes within the church that could suggest people are beginning to reject the belief that fertilized eggs have souls.


“The trouble from the Vatican’s point of view is that few people outside of the Roman Catholic Church – and, it seems, a decreasing number of people within it – believe that ... A study reported today suggested that ‘Generation Y’... find religion largely irrelevant to their lives; only one in five believes in a personal, creator God who listens to their prayers.”


And Fox News reports others believe limits should be set on who can receive the treatment.


“And even some doctors say the technique should be off limits to some women, like the world’s oldest mother who gave birth at the age of 70.  Two years later, she’s now dying.  And remember OctoMom?  She used in-vitro to give birth to octuplets even though she already had six children, was out of work, and on welfare.”


But PBS reports despite the negative uproar against IVF and its founders, others contend it is a landmark development for medicine.


JUDY WOODRUFF: So how would you sum up what Edwards did, the contribution he made?
DR. ROBERT STILLMAN: Monumental. Monumental for the four million children who were born. It was a great scientific achievement then. It's a great clinical and human triumph now.


So what do you think?  Have Edwards and his colleague Patrick Steptoe been playing God in the human world? Or is the birth of four million babies enough proof that in science ordinary people can create extraordinary things?
 

Vatican Official Criticizes Nobel Prize for IVF Pioneer

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Oct 6, 2010

Vatican Official Criticizes Nobel Prize for IVF Pioneer

Image Source: (LearnVest)


BY VANESSA MANCAO & ALEXANDRA OLGIN


“The Nobel Assembly at the Karolinska Institute decided to award the Nobel Prize in physiology or medicine 2010 to Robert Edwards for the development of In-Vitro fertilization.” (PBS)


But upon receiving the award, 85 year-old- professor Robert Edwards met some not-so-surprising resistance from a Vatican official.  The head of the Pontifical Academy for Life Ignacio Carrasco de Paula spoke out against the award, saying it ignored the ethical questions raised by the fertility treatment.


The Catholic News Service translated a written statement
de Paula made about Edwards’ recognition.

“...without Edwards there wouldn't be a market for oocytes (immature egg cells), without Edwards there wouldn't be freezers full of embryos waiting to be transferred [en]utero or, more likely, to be used for research or to die abandoned and forgotten by everyone."


And although the Vatican released a statement saying de Paula’s views are his own, it has a history of resistance against artificial insemination.  But an article in the Telegraph points to changes within the church that could suggest people are beginning to reject the belief that fertilized eggs have souls.


“The trouble from the Vatican’s point of view is that few people outside of the Roman Catholic Church – and, it seems, a decreasing number of people within it – believe that ... A study reported today suggested that ‘Generation Y’... find religion largely irrelevant to their lives; only one in five believes in a personal, creator God who listens to their prayers.”


And Fox News reports others believe limits should be set on who can receive the treatment.


“And even some doctors say the technique should be off limits to some women, like the world’s oldest mother who gave birth at the age of 70.  Two years later, she’s now dying.  And remember OctoMom?  She used in-vitro to give birth to octuplets even though she already had six children, was out of work, and on welfare.”


But PBS reports despite the negative uproar against IVF and its founders, others contend it is a landmark development for medicine.


JUDY WOODRUFF: So how would you sum up what Edwards did, the contribution he made?
DR. ROBERT STILLMAN: Monumental. Monumental for the four million children who were born. It was a great scientific achievement then. It's a great clinical and human triumph now.


So what do you think?  Have Edwards and his colleague Patrick Steptoe been playing God in the human world? Or is the birth of four million babies enough proof that in science ordinary people can create extraordinary things?
 

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