(Image Source: Wikimedia Commons)
BY SHANLEY REYNOLDS
ANCHOR ZACH TOOMBS


The Obama administration has ok’d a plan that would require all future cars to have Event Data Recorders - or black boxes - in them.  WPTY explains these boxes...

“...tap into the electronics in many newer cars to track vehicle speed, air bag readiness, if you’re wearing a seatbelt - and more.”

Black boxes have been installed in airplanes for years to help investigators figure out what happened in the event of a plane crash.

They’re also installed in 96% of new cars, as Lt. Gov. Timothy Murray discovered last year — after he crashed his car and told police he had been driving the speed limit and wearing his seatbelt — but the black box in his car told authorities he was not buckled in, and speeding at 100 mph.
(Photo Source: T&G File Photo/PAUL KAPTEYN)
(Photo Source: T&G STAFF / TOM RETTIG)
(Video Source: KTVD


The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration wants to require them for all cars and regulate the kind of data they collect. That idea is causing a lot of privacy concerns. Here’s WDTN.

“...the insurance industry supports the move. but privacy advocates call it intrusive technology.
...these black boxes belong to the owner and the data on them shouldn't be available to the police or anyone else without a warrant.”


But a legal analyst on Fox News says it is completely legal.

“You have something that records all of that activity that can say, wait a minute, it's not the product. It's the manner in which the product was used.”

Privacy advocates have voiced concerns about who would have access to the information the black box records. NBC reports

“Rules vary by state, but in much of the country a law enforcement official — or a plaintiff in a legal case — must get court approval before a vehicle's black box can be accessed without the permission of the owner.”

But a blogger for The Christian Science Monitor says insurance companies will try to get their hands on that data regardless.

“While we may be safe from law enforcement wirelessly accessing data from black boxes (for the near future, anyway), we know one thing for certain: insurance companies aren’t in the business of losing money, and if such data can be used to pad profits, chances are good insurers will find a way to do so.”

The Christian Science Monitor also reports General Motors has been using Event Data Recorders in their cars since 1995. Other manufacturers like Ford, Toyota and Mazda also install them.

US Could Mandate Data-Collecting Boxes in All Cars

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Dec 9, 2012

US Could Mandate Data-Collecting Boxes in All Cars

(Image Source: Wikimedia Commons)
BY SHANLEY REYNOLDS
ANCHOR ZACH TOOMBS


The Obama administration has ok’d a plan that would require all future cars to have Event Data Recorders - or black boxes - in them.  WPTY explains these boxes...

“...tap into the electronics in many newer cars to track vehicle speed, air bag readiness, if you’re wearing a seatbelt - and more.”

Black boxes have been installed in airplanes for years to help investigators figure out what happened in the event of a plane crash.

They’re also installed in 96% of new cars, as Lt. Gov. Timothy Murray discovered last year — after he crashed his car and told police he had been driving the speed limit and wearing his seatbelt — but the black box in his car told authorities he was not buckled in, and speeding at 100 mph.
(Photo Source: T&G File Photo/PAUL KAPTEYN)
(Photo Source: T&G STAFF / TOM RETTIG)
(Video Source: KTVD


The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration wants to require them for all cars and regulate the kind of data they collect. That idea is causing a lot of privacy concerns. Here’s WDTN.

“...the insurance industry supports the move. but privacy advocates call it intrusive technology.
...these black boxes belong to the owner and the data on them shouldn't be available to the police or anyone else without a warrant.”


But a legal analyst on Fox News says it is completely legal.

“You have something that records all of that activity that can say, wait a minute, it's not the product. It's the manner in which the product was used.”

Privacy advocates have voiced concerns about who would have access to the information the black box records. NBC reports

“Rules vary by state, but in much of the country a law enforcement official — or a plaintiff in a legal case — must get court approval before a vehicle's black box can be accessed without the permission of the owner.”

But a blogger for The Christian Science Monitor says insurance companies will try to get their hands on that data regardless.

“While we may be safe from law enforcement wirelessly accessing data from black boxes (for the near future, anyway), we know one thing for certain: insurance companies aren’t in the business of losing money, and if such data can be used to pad profits, chances are good insurers will find a way to do so.”

The Christian Science Monitor also reports General Motors has been using Event Data Recorders in their cars since 1995. Other manufacturers like Ford, Toyota and Mazda also install them.

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