(Image Source: Wikimedia Commons)

BY SHANLEY REYNOLDS
ANCHOR JAMAL ANDRESS


The U.S. House of Representatives approved changes to the Video Privacy Protection Act on Tuesday.  

The original bill was put into place in 1988 after Robert Bork’s video rental history was leaked to the press when he was nominated for the Supreme Court. The publication of his rentals eventually blocked his nomination.
Bork passed away Wednesday from complications from heart disease, at the age of 85.

The current law says someone has to grant written permission every single time anyone wants to access their video rental history. NBC explains how that would change if the Senate approves this version.

“The new bill allows people to a one-time consent to share the videos titles with the public, which for the time being means Facebook, but would apply to other social media outlets or whatever channels a video provider such as Netflix could use.”

The Next Web describes the change as being similar to the way Spotify is able to share the songs you listen to via social media.

A similar bill was stopped in the Senate a year ago, but Mashable reports the details the Senate had a problem with have been dealt with...

“The new bill specifically addresses those by requiring rental companies to give users a clear way to withdraw their approval of sharing and to set 24-month automatic expiry of the consent, unless user re-opts in.”

The current bill has been assumed to extend to include online videos, a change Netflix has lobbied for for nearly two years. CNET has a statement from the streaming video company.

“We are pleased the house has moved to modernize the VPPA, giving consumers more freedom to share with friends when they want. We look forward to swift action in the Senate."

But the legislative council for The American Civil Liberties Union says there are more important privacy concerns to be addressed.

“If we are to achieve true reform – which means getting full protection for Americans’ in-boxes and private communication – we cannot give priority to special interests.”

 

Updated Video Privacy Protection Act Passes Through House

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Dec 19, 2012

Updated Video Privacy Protection Act Passes Through House

(Image Source: Wikimedia Commons)

BY SHANLEY REYNOLDS
ANCHOR JAMAL ANDRESS


The U.S. House of Representatives approved changes to the Video Privacy Protection Act on Tuesday.  

The original bill was put into place in 1988 after Robert Bork’s video rental history was leaked to the press when he was nominated for the Supreme Court. The publication of his rentals eventually blocked his nomination.
Bork passed away Wednesday from complications from heart disease, at the age of 85.

The current law says someone has to grant written permission every single time anyone wants to access their video rental history. NBC explains how that would change if the Senate approves this version.

“The new bill allows people to a one-time consent to share the videos titles with the public, which for the time being means Facebook, but would apply to other social media outlets or whatever channels a video provider such as Netflix could use.”

The Next Web describes the change as being similar to the way Spotify is able to share the songs you listen to via social media.

A similar bill was stopped in the Senate a year ago, but Mashable reports the details the Senate had a problem with have been dealt with...

“The new bill specifically addresses those by requiring rental companies to give users a clear way to withdraw their approval of sharing and to set 24-month automatic expiry of the consent, unless user re-opts in.”

The current bill has been assumed to extend to include online videos, a change Netflix has lobbied for for nearly two years. CNET has a statement from the streaming video company.

“We are pleased the house has moved to modernize the VPPA, giving consumers more freedom to share with friends when they want. We look forward to swift action in the Senate."

But the legislative council for The American Civil Liberties Union says there are more important privacy concerns to be addressed.

“If we are to achieve true reform – which means getting full protection for Americans’ in-boxes and private communication – we cannot give priority to special interests.”

 

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