(Thumbnail image from USOpen.org)

 

“I swear to God I’m… going to take this… ball and shove it down your… throat, you hear that? I swear to God. You better be glad — you better be glad that I’m not, I swear.” (CBS)

 

Serena Williams suffered her first US Open loss since the quarterfinals in 2007 when she was handed a second code violation for yelling profanity at a line judge who had called a foot fault during match point.  The defending-champion Williams lost the match after it was ruled the outburst would result in the loss of a point.


Williams’ opponent Kim Clijsters went on to win the US Open title but it was Williams who got all the media attention this weekend.

We’re looking at perspectives from the New York Daily News, ESPN, New York Times, New York Magazine and the Daily Telegraph.

 

First let’s go to ESPN where infamous tennis bad boy turned commentator John McEnroe told ESPN that at that level of play, in that point in the match, the line judge was wrong to call a foot fault.

 

"... you can't call a foot fault there. Out of the question. It wasn't as if it was an obvious foot fault. At the very least, it was minuscule. I have seen Serena come back from that spot a dozen times before, against top-flight opponents."

 

McEnroe’s comment echoes Williams’ own words.

 

“All year, I mean, I haven’t been foot faulted and in this tournament they keep calling it and I’m not saying I don’t but I don’t know.” (ESPN)

 

A Daily Telegraph columnist focuses more at the violation, saying Williams must be punished.

 

“Williams's actions amounted to abuse, the kind of vile, threatening behaviour that has no place in sport. [The loss] might seem punishment enough. It is not. It is an escape.”

 

Looking at the punishment, New York Daily News columnist Filip Bondy questions if being a female player resulted in the harsher reaction of a $10,500 fine.


“Fans have become comfortably uncomfortable with these displays of testosterone, satisfied with the customary penalty: a tut-tut and a $1,000 fine. But what we saw late Saturday night was something very different, precedent-setting: A woman standing near the baseline, out of her mind with fury.


New York Magazine defends Williams. They likened the foot fault to a phantom tag in baseball and said the line judge was being overly sensitive in a situation she had put herself in.


“The line judge put herself at the middle of the action and let her own inability to handle an angry player decide who won the semifinal at the U.S. Open. We cannot fathom why she's not taking more heat. Because if we were Serena Williams ... we would have wanted to shove that ball down her throat, too.”

Unsportsmanlike Behavior, or Just Unladylike?

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Sep 15, 2009

Unsportsmanlike Behavior, or Just Unladylike?

(Thumbnail image from USOpen.org)

 

“I swear to God I’m… going to take this… ball and shove it down your… throat, you hear that? I swear to God. You better be glad — you better be glad that I’m not, I swear.” (CBS)

 

Serena Williams suffered her first US Open loss since the quarterfinals in 2007 when she was handed a second code violation for yelling profanity at a line judge who had called a foot fault during match point.  The defending-champion Williams lost the match after it was ruled the outburst would result in the loss of a point.


Williams’ opponent Kim Clijsters went on to win the US Open title but it was Williams who got all the media attention this weekend.

We’re looking at perspectives from the New York Daily News, ESPN, New York Times, New York Magazine and the Daily Telegraph.

 

First let’s go to ESPN where infamous tennis bad boy turned commentator John McEnroe told ESPN that at that level of play, in that point in the match, the line judge was wrong to call a foot fault.

 

"... you can't call a foot fault there. Out of the question. It wasn't as if it was an obvious foot fault. At the very least, it was minuscule. I have seen Serena come back from that spot a dozen times before, against top-flight opponents."

 

McEnroe’s comment echoes Williams’ own words.

 

“All year, I mean, I haven’t been foot faulted and in this tournament they keep calling it and I’m not saying I don’t but I don’t know.” (ESPN)

 

A Daily Telegraph columnist focuses more at the violation, saying Williams must be punished.

 

“Williams's actions amounted to abuse, the kind of vile, threatening behaviour that has no place in sport. [The loss] might seem punishment enough. It is not. It is an escape.”

 

Looking at the punishment, New York Daily News columnist Filip Bondy questions if being a female player resulted in the harsher reaction of a $10,500 fine.


“Fans have become comfortably uncomfortable with these displays of testosterone, satisfied with the customary penalty: a tut-tut and a $1,000 fine. But what we saw late Saturday night was something very different, precedent-setting: A woman standing near the baseline, out of her mind with fury.


New York Magazine defends Williams. They likened the foot fault to a phantom tag in baseball and said the line judge was being overly sensitive in a situation she had put herself in.


“The line judge put herself at the middle of the action and let her own inability to handle an angry player decide who won the semifinal at the U.S. Open. We cannot fathom why she's not taking more heat. Because if we were Serena Williams ... we would have wanted to shove that ball down her throat, too.”

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