(Image Source: Flickr / Phil Roeder)

 

BY SAMANTHA KUBOTA

ANCHOR LAUREN ZIMA


The controversial Arizona immigration law is set to be reviewed by the U.S. Supreme Court two years after it became law. Arguments are expected to start Wednesday. KMSB has more.


“Legal experts say the courts ruling on SB 1070 could set a precedent for other states on how they enforce immigration law. The Justice Department followed suit, stating that only the federal government could address immigration issues.”

USA Today explains how, with SB 1070, states took on the federal government’s authority.

“The case is the culmination of growing frustration in states over the inability of Washington to agree on a way to handle the country’s illegal immigrants ... That has resulted in a complex web of state laws that have gone in wildly different directions.”

Back in 2010, just as SB 1070 was about to take effect, a federal judge blocked key components of the bill. Here's KNXV.

“That includes the part where police are required to ask for documentation during an enforcement stop if they suspect a person is in the country illegally. Also on the portion of the law making it a state crime to be in Arizona illegally and to solicit work as an illegal immigrant. “

The initial backlash against the law seemed to be because people feared it would cause racial profiling. Voice of America quotes one of the attorneys who helped bring the case against the law.

“I think what you have here is the potential for people of certain color of skin or people of certain hair or certain accents being subject to greater scrutiny," he [Daniel Ortega Jr.] said.

But the media isn’t reporting much about that aspect of the law now.  The Christian Science Monitor explains the main question in the case is...

“...whether Arizona and other states are entitled to pass state laws that mirror specific provisions in federal immigration statutes and strictly enforce those provisions even when the Obama administration has decided – as a matter of policy and budgetary constraint – not to enforce those same provisions.”

The Supreme Court is expected to make its decision on the case sometime this summer.wwwwwwww

U.S. Supreme Court Set to Review Arizona Immigration Law

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Apr 24, 2012

U.S. Supreme Court Set to Review Arizona Immigration Law

(Image Source: Flickr / Phil Roeder)

 

BY SAMANTHA KUBOTA

ANCHOR LAUREN ZIMA


The controversial Arizona immigration law is set to be reviewed by the U.S. Supreme Court two years after it became law. Arguments are expected to start Wednesday. KMSB has more.


“Legal experts say the courts ruling on SB 1070 could set a precedent for other states on how they enforce immigration law. The Justice Department followed suit, stating that only the federal government could address immigration issues.”

USA Today explains how, with SB 1070, states took on the federal government’s authority.

“The case is the culmination of growing frustration in states over the inability of Washington to agree on a way to handle the country’s illegal immigrants ... That has resulted in a complex web of state laws that have gone in wildly different directions.”

Back in 2010, just as SB 1070 was about to take effect, a federal judge blocked key components of the bill. Here's KNXV.

“That includes the part where police are required to ask for documentation during an enforcement stop if they suspect a person is in the country illegally. Also on the portion of the law making it a state crime to be in Arizona illegally and to solicit work as an illegal immigrant. “

The initial backlash against the law seemed to be because people feared it would cause racial profiling. Voice of America quotes one of the attorneys who helped bring the case against the law.

“I think what you have here is the potential for people of certain color of skin or people of certain hair or certain accents being subject to greater scrutiny," he [Daniel Ortega Jr.] said.

But the media isn’t reporting much about that aspect of the law now.  The Christian Science Monitor explains the main question in the case is...

“...whether Arizona and other states are entitled to pass state laws that mirror specific provisions in federal immigration statutes and strictly enforce those provisions even when the Obama administration has decided – as a matter of policy and budgetary constraint – not to enforce those same provisions.”

The Supreme Court is expected to make its decision on the case sometime this summer.wwwwwwww

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