Image Source: Wikimedia Commons

BY NICHOLE CARTMELL

ANCHOR MEGAN MURPHY 

U.S. drone strikes killed as many as 15 in Pakistan, including a powerful Taliban commander. Here’s CNN.

“Pakistani intelligence officials are saying two major Taliban commanders were killed in U.S. drone strikes in Northern Pakistan. They say Maulvi Nazir was killed when a drone fired two missiles at his vehicle.”

According to The New York Times, Mr. Nazir and his loyalists regularly joined attacks on American forces across the border in Afghanistan. And unlike other Taliban factions his focus was on the war in Afghanistan, not inside Pakistan. Mr. Nazir was even believed to have signed a peace pact with the Pakistani military. The Washington Post explains...

“Nazir opposed attacks on Pakistani army troops but supported attacks on U.S. and other Western troops in neighboring Afghanistan. His stance reflected serious differences with some other Taliban commanders, who believe that Pakistan, a close ally of the United States, must also be targeted.”

But for some his death might be a good thing. The author of "Pakistan Before and After Obama" tells The Wall Street Journal, Mr. Nazir was known to house militants that likely included members of al Qaeda. These members are said to have played a role in the attacks on Pakistani targets. He says...

"It was a double game he was playing. I don't think the Pakistanis would be annoyed" by his killing.

In the past, Pakistan has been complicit with drone attacks, even often offering intelligence. And while the death of Mr. Nazir is seen as a victory for the U.S., the BBC is predicting Pakistan will actually condemn the attacks this time. Not only was Mr. Nazir seen as pro-Pakistani in a way, but...

“...there is now a power vacuum in South Waziristan and there will be different factions within the Taliban and leaders within it who will now be trying to fight for position and that could create some instabilities.”

The Washington Post reports a separate drone strike Wednesday killed three militants, including commander Faisal Khan of the Pakistani Taliban.

 

U.S. Drone Strike Kills Powerful Taliban Commander

by Nichole Cartmell
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Transcript
Jan 3, 2013

U.S. Drone Strike Kills Powerful Taliban Commander

 

Image Source: Wikimedia Commons

BY NICHOLE CARTMELL

ANCHOR MEGAN MURPHY 

U.S. drone strikes killed as many as 15 in Pakistan, including a powerful Taliban commander. Here’s CNN.

“Pakistani intelligence officials are saying two major Taliban commanders were killed in U.S. drone strikes in Northern Pakistan. They say Maulvi Nazir was killed when a drone fired two missiles at his vehicle.”

According to The New York Times, Mr. Nazir and his loyalists regularly joined attacks on American forces across the border in Afghanistan. And unlike other Taliban factions his focus was on the war in Afghanistan, not inside Pakistan. Mr. Nazir was even believed to have signed a peace pact with the Pakistani military. The Washington Post explains...

“Nazir opposed attacks on Pakistani army troops but supported attacks on U.S. and other Western troops in neighboring Afghanistan. His stance reflected serious differences with some other Taliban commanders, who believe that Pakistan, a close ally of the United States, must also be targeted.”

But for some his death might be a good thing. The author of "Pakistan Before and After Obama" tells The Wall Street Journal, Mr. Nazir was known to house militants that likely included members of al Qaeda. These members are said to have played a role in the attacks on Pakistani targets. He says...

"It was a double game he was playing. I don't think the Pakistanis would be annoyed" by his killing.

In the past, Pakistan has been complicit with drone attacks, even often offering intelligence. And while the death of Mr. Nazir is seen as a victory for the U.S., the BBC is predicting Pakistan will actually condemn the attacks this time. Not only was Mr. Nazir seen as pro-Pakistani in a way, but...

“...there is now a power vacuum in South Waziristan and there will be different factions within the Taliban and leaders within it who will now be trying to fight for position and that could create some instabilities.”

The Washington Post reports a separate drone strike Wednesday killed three militants, including commander Faisal Khan of the Pakistani Taliban.

 

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