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Now that President Obama’s decision to replace U.S. Gen. Stanley McChrystal has had a chance to sink in, international media are turning their attention to his successor, Gen. David Petraeus.

We’re analyzing coverage from the U.S.’s allies in Afghanistan, and what appears to be an overwhelmingly negative assessment of the situation.

A reporter on the ground in Afghanistan for Canada’s CTV says the change in power is yet another bump in the road that could run off allies.

“Well it certainly is a fairly large disruption to a strategy that was already proving to be flawed here. ... So there seems to be few signs of success. And what this article in Rolling Stone also did was expose a lot of infighting at the highest level in the civilian chain of command. So it paints a very volatile picture for countries like Canada, the Netherlands, and now Australia, who are now looking toward the exit.”

An Afghanistan expert for Radio Netherlands Worldwide looks at how the decision affects the U.S. relationship with its NATO allies.

“It seems to be an American decision with President Obama and McChrystal, a Washington based development. And the American’s take the lead for that, and feel more dominant, and they are. I mean, NATO is only 25 percent, anymore. ... I think Washington is more and more skeptical on NATO, and what they really want in Afghanistan. The reality is that it is more of an American war, nowadays.”


ANCHOR: “And the change in leadership from Gen. McChrystal to Gen. Petraeus won’t change that?”


“No, that won’t change, no.”

A report from Australia’s ABC has high praise for General Petraeus, but seems to wonder if his health is up to the task.

“The highly regarded architect of the surge in Iraq, Gen. David Petraeus, who fainted during a Congressional hearing last week, is McChrystal’s replacement. ... His predecessors ignominious end has highlighted divisions over Afghan policy, and the size of the task now confronting Petraeus. He’s also a prostate cancer survivor, and the president says he’s accepted the command at great personal sacrifice.”

But a writer for the BBC says, despite all of the issues surrounding the appointment of Petraeus, at least he won’t repeat his predecessor’s mistake.

“As a man with an interest in the classics, Gen. Petraeus has always followed the Latin injunction Fortiter in re, suaviter in modo (Be tough in your aims, but smooth in the way you put them into practice).”

The defense and diplomatic editor for The Financial Times says the crucial time frame for Petraeus to be successful is between now and the end of the year.

“The key question now is what Petraeus can achieve on the ground. Because what’s happened is this: over the last few months McChrystal’s strategy hasn’t gone very well, and I think that may be one of the reasons they’ve gotten rid of him. ... I think the central issue will be where things are for Gen. Petraeus and for the Alliance at the end of this year.”


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WRITER: Newsy Staff

PRODUCER: Newsy Staff

U.S. Command Shift in Afghanistan Has Allies Skeptical

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Jun 24, 2010

U.S. Command Shift in Afghanistan Has Allies Skeptical

(Thumbnail Image: The White House)

 

Get more multi-source political news from Newsy.com.

 

Now that President Obama’s decision to replace U.S. Gen. Stanley McChrystal has had a chance to sink in, international media are turning their attention to his successor, Gen. David Petraeus.

We’re analyzing coverage from the U.S.’s allies in Afghanistan, and what appears to be an overwhelmingly negative assessment of the situation.

A reporter on the ground in Afghanistan for Canada’s CTV says the change in power is yet another bump in the road that could run off allies.

“Well it certainly is a fairly large disruption to a strategy that was already proving to be flawed here. ... So there seems to be few signs of success. And what this article in Rolling Stone also did was expose a lot of infighting at the highest level in the civilian chain of command. So it paints a very volatile picture for countries like Canada, the Netherlands, and now Australia, who are now looking toward the exit.”

An Afghanistan expert for Radio Netherlands Worldwide looks at how the decision affects the U.S. relationship with its NATO allies.

“It seems to be an American decision with President Obama and McChrystal, a Washington based development. And the American’s take the lead for that, and feel more dominant, and they are. I mean, NATO is only 25 percent, anymore. ... I think Washington is more and more skeptical on NATO, and what they really want in Afghanistan. The reality is that it is more of an American war, nowadays.”


ANCHOR: “And the change in leadership from Gen. McChrystal to Gen. Petraeus won’t change that?”


“No, that won’t change, no.”

A report from Australia’s ABC has high praise for General Petraeus, but seems to wonder if his health is up to the task.

“The highly regarded architect of the surge in Iraq, Gen. David Petraeus, who fainted during a Congressional hearing last week, is McChrystal’s replacement. ... His predecessors ignominious end has highlighted divisions over Afghan policy, and the size of the task now confronting Petraeus. He’s also a prostate cancer survivor, and the president says he’s accepted the command at great personal sacrifice.”

But a writer for the BBC says, despite all of the issues surrounding the appointment of Petraeus, at least he won’t repeat his predecessor’s mistake.

“As a man with an interest in the classics, Gen. Petraeus has always followed the Latin injunction Fortiter in re, suaviter in modo (Be tough in your aims, but smooth in the way you put them into practice).”

The defense and diplomatic editor for The Financial Times says the crucial time frame for Petraeus to be successful is between now and the end of the year.

“The key question now is what Petraeus can achieve on the ground. Because what’s happened is this: over the last few months McChrystal’s strategy hasn’t gone very well, and I think that may be one of the reasons they’ve gotten rid of him. ... I think the central issue will be where things are for Gen. Petraeus and for the Alliance at the end of this year.”


Get more multi-source political news from Newsy.com.

 

WRITER: Newsy Staff

PRODUCER: Newsy Staff

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