(Image source: Press Gazette)

 

 

BY ZACH TOOMBS

 

 

Another development in the U.K. phone hacking scandal. Two former editors for newspapers owned by Rupert Murdoch will face charges of bribery in a case that affects both Buckingham Palace and 10 Downing Street.

 

The Crown Prosecution Service accuses Andy Coulson, the former editor of the News of the World, and Clive Goodman, the paper’s former Royal editor, with illegally paying officials for information on the royal family. Both are already facing charges of phone hacking.

 

As for Rebekah Brooks, the former editor of The Sun newspaper, she and John Kay, the paper’s chief reporter, are accused of paying off a defense official for information. They too are caught up in phone hacking allegations.

 

The new charges again create headaches for Prime Minister David Cameron. ITV and others report Brooks is a close friend of Cameron. And, after working at the News of the World, Coulson served as Cameron’s communications chief. The BBC reports:

 

“He was once at the heart of government. And the new charges go right to the top of the British establishment … It is claimed that while he was at The News of the World, he offered payments to public officials in exchange for information, including a royal phone directory known as the green book.”

 

As Al Jazeera shows, Metropolitan police say Brooks and Sun reporter Kay paid $100,000 over seven years to Ministry of Defence official Bettina Jordan-Barber for information used in a series of Sun articles. She too will face bribery charges.

 

Coulson released a statement Tuesday calling the new charges bogus. Brooks has maintained her innocence throughout the phone hacking scandal. In Northern Ireland, Cameron also addressed the latest accusations. Here he is on Sky News.

 

“I’ve made it clear, my regret, on many occasions, about this issue. I’ve also said very clearly that we should allow the police and prosecuting authorities to follow the evidence wherever it leads.”

 

According to The Guardian, Metropolitan police say the investigations that started with phone hacking accusations could last another three years and cost 40 million pounds.

Two Former NewsCorp Editors Charged with Bribery

by Zach Toombs
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Transcript
Nov 20, 2012

Two Former NewsCorp Editors Charged with Bribery

(Image source: Press Gazette)

 

 

BY ZACH TOOMBS

 

 

Another development in the U.K. phone hacking scandal. Two former editors for newspapers owned by Rupert Murdoch will face charges of bribery in a case that affects both Buckingham Palace and 10 Downing Street.

 

The Crown Prosecution Service accuses Andy Coulson, the former editor of the News of the World, and Clive Goodman, the paper’s former Royal editor, with illegally paying officials for information on the royal family. Both are already facing charges of phone hacking.

 

As for Rebekah Brooks, the former editor of The Sun newspaper, she and John Kay, the paper’s chief reporter, are accused of paying off a defense official for information. They too are caught up in phone hacking allegations.

 

The new charges again create headaches for Prime Minister David Cameron. ITV and others report Brooks is a close friend of Cameron. And, after working at the News of the World, Coulson served as Cameron’s communications chief. The BBC reports:

 

“He was once at the heart of government. And the new charges go right to the top of the British establishment … It is claimed that while he was at The News of the World, he offered payments to public officials in exchange for information, including a royal phone directory known as the green book.”

 

As Al Jazeera shows, Metropolitan police say Brooks and Sun reporter Kay paid $100,000 over seven years to Ministry of Defence official Bettina Jordan-Barber for information used in a series of Sun articles. She too will face bribery charges.

 

Coulson released a statement Tuesday calling the new charges bogus. Brooks has maintained her innocence throughout the phone hacking scandal. In Northern Ireland, Cameron also addressed the latest accusations. Here he is on Sky News.

 

“I’ve made it clear, my regret, on many occasions, about this issue. I’ve also said very clearly that we should allow the police and prosecuting authorities to follow the evidence wherever it leads.”

 

According to The Guardian, Metropolitan police say the investigations that started with phone hacking accusations could last another three years and cost 40 million pounds.

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