(Image Source: Gizmodo)


BY MICHAEL COLLINS

ANCHOR LAUREN ZIMA

 

Social networking site Twitter admits it collects and keeps some users’ mobile data for up to a year and a half — without consent.

Here’s how it works. When Twitter users search for friends to add via their phone’s contact list, they allow Twitter access to their contact information and data. According to ZDNet ...

“The Twitter application... does not ask for permission before it scans your contacts and reveals your contacts’ Twitter accounts. Looking into Twitter’s privacy policy, it does not explicitly disclose that it uploads and stores your contact information.”

The LA Times uncovered the practice on Tuesday, and immediately contacted Twitter. In response, a Twitter spokesperson says...

“We want to be clear and transparent in our communications with users ... in our next app updates... we are updating the language associated with Find Friends -- to be more explicit. In place of 'Scan your contacts,' we will use ‘Upload your contacts’ and ‘Import your contacts’.”

Twitter could potentially sell user information to third-party investors. But All Things D points out, apps like Twitter typically just store users’ contact info in order to...

“...connect users with friends who join the service at a later date. However, many apps could do more to access and store this data in an encrypted and anonymized way...”

A tech blogger for Silicon Valley adds — it’s fine for social networks to store data in order to connect users. The key question is — are companies being open about their data storage policies?

“...it’s about transparency and security. Are the companies being clear and honest about what they are collecting and what they are doing with it? And are they protecting that information?”

Twitter is only the latest company to catch heat over privacy concerns. After a string of poor privacy press coverage— it looks like lawmakers may want to get involved. Broadcasting & Cable reports two members of Congress have written to Apple, asking the company....

“...to answer a bunch of questions, including all iOS guidelines on privacy and security of data and what it considers data that requires affirmative consent from the user before it is transmitted.”

Apple has until February 29th to answer those questions.

 

Twitter Under Fire for Storing Contact Info

by Lauren Zima
0
Transcript
Feb 16, 2012

Twitter Under Fire for Storing Contact Info

(Image Source: Gizmodo)


BY MICHAEL COLLINS

ANCHOR LAUREN ZIMA

 

Social networking site Twitter admits it collects and keeps some users’ mobile data for up to a year and a half — without consent.

Here’s how it works. When Twitter users search for friends to add via their phone’s contact list, they allow Twitter access to their contact information and data. According to ZDNet ...

“The Twitter application... does not ask for permission before it scans your contacts and reveals your contacts’ Twitter accounts. Looking into Twitter’s privacy policy, it does not explicitly disclose that it uploads and stores your contact information.”

The LA Times uncovered the practice on Tuesday, and immediately contacted Twitter. In response, a Twitter spokesperson says...

“We want to be clear and transparent in our communications with users ... in our next app updates... we are updating the language associated with Find Friends -- to be more explicit. In place of 'Scan your contacts,' we will use ‘Upload your contacts’ and ‘Import your contacts’.”

Twitter could potentially sell user information to third-party investors. But All Things D points out, apps like Twitter typically just store users’ contact info in order to...

“...connect users with friends who join the service at a later date. However, many apps could do more to access and store this data in an encrypted and anonymized way...”

A tech blogger for Silicon Valley adds — it’s fine for social networks to store data in order to connect users. The key question is — are companies being open about their data storage policies?

“...it’s about transparency and security. Are the companies being clear and honest about what they are collecting and what they are doing with it? And are they protecting that information?”

Twitter is only the latest company to catch heat over privacy concerns. After a string of poor privacy press coverage— it looks like lawmakers may want to get involved. Broadcasting & Cable reports two members of Congress have written to Apple, asking the company....

“...to answer a bunch of questions, including all iOS guidelines on privacy and security of data and what it considers data that requires affirmative consent from the user before it is transmitted.”

Apple has until February 29th to answer those questions.

 

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