Image Source: Wikimedia Commons

BY MADISON MACK
ANCHOR ZACH TOOMBS


After spending twelve terms in Congress, three-time presidential hopeful Ron Paul took to the floor of the House Wednesday to give his farewell address.

Dr. Paul reflected on his career and touched on all of the issues he’s been crusading for over the last few decades. He says in spite of his efforts:

“...the government has grown exponentially, taxes remain excessive and the prolific increase of incomprehensible regulations continues … Wars are constant and pursued without congressional declaration, deficits rise to the sky, poverty is rampant...”

Paul went on to say the Constitution has failed to limit the size of the government but ended with an optimistic look at the future.

The 48-minute speech was so broad that most media outlets had trouble summarizing it. The Atlantic chose instead to list all of the questions Paul posed on the floor, concluding.

“One needn’t agree with the premise of every question to conclude that the United States - and especially its most unjustly treated citizens - would be better off if more legislators were grappling with them.”

Despite spending decades in the House of Representatives, Paul didn’t break into the political mainstream until he ran for the Republican presidential nomination in 2007 and found himself at odds with many of his Republican peers.

“We’re building an embassy in Iraq that’s bigger than the Vatican! We’re building 14 permanent bases. What would we say here if China was doing this here? We would be objecting. We need to look at what we do from the perspective of what would we do if someone did it to us.” 

Comments like that garnered Paul quite a following that evolved into the “Ron Paul Revolution.’ The movement culminated during his 2011 presidential run.

While Paul’s revolution never translated to much success in the polls, Paul’s rallies early in the primary process typically drew numbers that dwarfed other Republican hopefuls. And, perhaps more than any other Republican in recent history, he has consistently garnered the support of young voters. (Via YouTube)

Now as Paul ends his political career, The American Thinker says the movement he started will likely be a permanent fixture in American politics.

“...and could very well form the basis of a third party if his son and heir apparent Rand wants to take it that way. At the very least, they have the opportunity to transform the Republican party as the movement Paul headed continues to grow.”

In the end, the Los Angeles Times says nothing better summarizes Dr. Paul...

“...than a plea he made toward the end of his speech, in which he asked the nation to forego envy, greed and intolerance and supplant them with ‘love, compassion, tolerance and free-market economics.’”

Paul says he plans to continue spreading his message by speaking at college campuses. Check out the transcript for a link to the full speech.
 

Twelve-Term Congressman Ron Paul Says Farewell to Congress

by
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Transcript
Nov 15, 2012

Twelve-Term Congressman Ron Paul Says Farewell to Congress

 

Image Source: Wikimedia Commons

BY MADISON MACK
ANCHOR ZACH TOOMBS


After spending twelve terms in Congress, three-time presidential hopeful Ron Paul took to the floor of the House Wednesday to give his farewell address.

Dr. Paul reflected on his career and touched on all of the issues he’s been crusading for over the last few decades. He says in spite of his efforts:

“...the government has grown exponentially, taxes remain excessive and the prolific increase of incomprehensible regulations continues … Wars are constant and pursued without congressional declaration, deficits rise to the sky, poverty is rampant...”

Paul went on to say the Constitution has failed to limit the size of the government but ended with an optimistic look at the future.

The 48-minute speech was so broad that most media outlets had trouble summarizing it. The Atlantic chose instead to list all of the questions Paul posed on the floor, concluding.

“One needn’t agree with the premise of every question to conclude that the United States - and especially its most unjustly treated citizens - would be better off if more legislators were grappling with them.”

Despite spending decades in the House of Representatives, Paul didn’t break into the political mainstream until he ran for the Republican presidential nomination in 2007 and found himself at odds with many of his Republican peers.

“We’re building an embassy in Iraq that’s bigger than the Vatican! We’re building 14 permanent bases. What would we say here if China was doing this here? We would be objecting. We need to look at what we do from the perspective of what would we do if someone did it to us.” 

Comments like that garnered Paul quite a following that evolved into the “Ron Paul Revolution.’ The movement culminated during his 2011 presidential run.

While Paul’s revolution never translated to much success in the polls, Paul’s rallies early in the primary process typically drew numbers that dwarfed other Republican hopefuls. And, perhaps more than any other Republican in recent history, he has consistently garnered the support of young voters. (Via YouTube)

Now as Paul ends his political career, The American Thinker says the movement he started will likely be a permanent fixture in American politics.

“...and could very well form the basis of a third party if his son and heir apparent Rand wants to take it that way. At the very least, they have the opportunity to transform the Republican party as the movement Paul headed continues to grow.”

In the end, the Los Angeles Times says nothing better summarizes Dr. Paul...

“...than a plea he made toward the end of his speech, in which he asked the nation to forego envy, greed and intolerance and supplant them with ‘love, compassion, tolerance and free-market economics.’”

Paul says he plans to continue spreading his message by speaking at college campuses. Check out the transcript for a link to the full speech.
 

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