TweeVee, Twittervision, Twitter-TV, no matter how you say it -- it’s causing a stir.

We’re looking at perspectives about a production company’s plans to develop a show about the service, and, taking it further, examining Twitter’s role in the business world overall.

First, a blog on Computer World gives the rare perspective that Twitter on TV is a good thing.

“I'm actually rather happy to see Twitter making its way onto the small screen. One key to the wide-spread adoption of social media tools like Twitter is to make them familiar to more than just tech-heads and geeks, and television is a perfect vehicle for that.”

But that voice is quiet compared to the mostly negative discussion about the move - including that from so-called Twitter King Ashton Kutcher, quoted in New York Daily News’ gossip column as saying,

“‘Wow, I hope this isn't true. I really don't like being sold out. May have to take a twitter hiatus.’”

But while Hollywood is worried about Twitter selling out -- others are looking for Twitter to simply sell.

Financial news organization 24/7 Wall Street says it’s the perfect place to build your brand.

“…having the opportunity to tell customers about attractive sales and new products can be done at remarkably low cost while providing for greater geographic accuracy.”

But Nielsen Wire takes a different perspective, saying Twitter is just a fad and citing research that 60 percent of new users don’t come back the next month.

BusinessWeek agrees -- saying the far-reaching benefits of social networking sites are a myth, and that advertisers should stay away.

“Twitter has millions of users, but apparently only four of them actually understand what it does…Are these the people who will buy the plastic polymer gaskets your company manufacturers? I don't think so.”


CNET takes us right to the source -- the Twitter creators themselves.

“You have to focus on delivering value first and profit second, especially considering we’re only two years old.”

CNET goes on to say that the creators haven’t forgotten about improving the bottom line.

So how are they going to do that?  One plan is to possibly charge fees for companies.

So what do you think about Twitter’s future plans and their role in the world of business?

Twee-Vee: Twitter Gets Down to Business

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May 27, 2009

Twee-Vee: Twitter Gets Down to Business

TweeVee, Twittervision, Twitter-TV, no matter how you say it -- it’s causing a stir.

We’re looking at perspectives about a production company’s plans to develop a show about the service, and, taking it further, examining Twitter’s role in the business world overall.

First, a blog on Computer World gives the rare perspective that Twitter on TV is a good thing.

“I'm actually rather happy to see Twitter making its way onto the small screen. One key to the wide-spread adoption of social media tools like Twitter is to make them familiar to more than just tech-heads and geeks, and television is a perfect vehicle for that.”

But that voice is quiet compared to the mostly negative discussion about the move - including that from so-called Twitter King Ashton Kutcher, quoted in New York Daily News’ gossip column as saying,

“‘Wow, I hope this isn't true. I really don't like being sold out. May have to take a twitter hiatus.’”

But while Hollywood is worried about Twitter selling out -- others are looking for Twitter to simply sell.

Financial news organization 24/7 Wall Street says it’s the perfect place to build your brand.

“…having the opportunity to tell customers about attractive sales and new products can be done at remarkably low cost while providing for greater geographic accuracy.”

But Nielsen Wire takes a different perspective, saying Twitter is just a fad and citing research that 60 percent of new users don’t come back the next month.

BusinessWeek agrees -- saying the far-reaching benefits of social networking sites are a myth, and that advertisers should stay away.

“Twitter has millions of users, but apparently only four of them actually understand what it does…Are these the people who will buy the plastic polymer gaskets your company manufacturers? I don't think so.”


CNET takes us right to the source -- the Twitter creators themselves.

“You have to focus on delivering value first and profit second, especially considering we’re only two years old.”

CNET goes on to say that the creators haven’t forgotten about improving the bottom line.

So how are they going to do that?  One plan is to possibly charge fees for companies.

So what do you think about Twitter’s future plans and their role in the world of business?
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