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So You Want To Bring A Turkey On An Airplane ...

Find out which dishes you can bring on a flight.

By Katherine Biek | November 18, 2016

Ever wonder if you could bring a butternut squash in your carry-on while flying?

Probably not. But the Transportation Security Administration wants all passengers flying Thanksgiving week to know exactly which holiday staples — including said squash — are allowed on planes.

SEE MORE: Do You Have What It Takes To Get On The TSA's PreCheck List?

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Let's start with the main course: the turkey. The TSA says you can actually bring it along in your carry-on.

But if your turkey is packed with ice in a cooler, that ice needs to be totally frozen when it's screened. If not, it's considered a liquid and won't be allowed.

If you're a fan of turducken — a chicken stuffed in a duck wedged inside a turkey — that's also allowed in a carry-on bag.

Stuffing, lettuce and any kind of pie can pass through TSA security checkpoints — just know that some pies might need additional screening.

But other popular Thanksgiving foods fall into a slightly gray area.

Like mashed potatoes. The TSA considers the instant potato flakes to be a solid, so that's OK to take on board. But already-made mashed potatoes needs to be packed in a checked bag because it's considered a gel.

Fruits and vegetables like squash, cranberries and green beans are only allowed in carry-on luggage if they're in solid form.

But if you get them in a can that's larger than 3.4 ounces, you better put it in your checked bag or ship it.

The takeaway here is this: If you can spread or spill a food item, then the TSA will most likely consider it a liquid, and you shouldn't try to bring it on a plane. So don't even ask about gravy.

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