(Image Source: China Daily)

BY CHRISTIAN BRYANT

Authorities in Central China are moving forward with what’s being called a cultural affront to Chinese people — the controversial undertaking of “tomb-flattening” — despite sources saying otherwise.

The actual process has been described by Chinese sources as the relocation of tombs to more rural parts of the country and the flattening of gravesites to make more farmland available.

A report earlier this week said the campaign was halted because of protests following the actual removal of anywhere from hundreds of thousands to millions of tombs. But as China Daily reports, a city spokeswoman says the plans are still going forward.
Chinese tomb:

Caixin Media explains why the Chinese government wants to move millions of tombs, saying:

“Though China has a vast expanse of land, it has limited arable land and a huge population. Faced with this contradiction, funeral reform was unavoidable.”

Rural citizens plan to protest by not cultivating the farmland, and Global Times reports they’re not the only citizens in opposition.


Twenty-six scholars across the country published an open letter on the Internet, calling for local governments to halt the tomb destruction, saying it “has infringed on peoples' freedom to worship, devastated Chinese culture and hurt the public's feelings.”

A Caixin reporter foresees future issues with tomb removal, saying legal complications, overall cost of relocation and blowback from citizens could derail the entire campaign.
 

'Tomb-Flattening' Campaign Presses On in Central China

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Nov 23, 2012

'Tomb-Flattening' Campaign Presses On in Central China

(Image Source: China Daily)

BY CHRISTIAN BRYANT

Authorities in Central China are moving forward with what’s being called a cultural affront to Chinese people — the controversial undertaking of “tomb-flattening” — despite sources saying otherwise.

The actual process has been described by Chinese sources as the relocation of tombs to more rural parts of the country and the flattening of gravesites to make more farmland available.

A report earlier this week said the campaign was halted because of protests following the actual removal of anywhere from hundreds of thousands to millions of tombs. But as China Daily reports, a city spokeswoman says the plans are still going forward.
Chinese tomb:

Caixin Media explains why the Chinese government wants to move millions of tombs, saying:

“Though China has a vast expanse of land, it has limited arable land and a huge population. Faced with this contradiction, funeral reform was unavoidable.”

Rural citizens plan to protest by not cultivating the farmland, and Global Times reports they’re not the only citizens in opposition.


Twenty-six scholars across the country published an open letter on the Internet, calling for local governments to halt the tomb destruction, saying it “has infringed on peoples' freedom to worship, devastated Chinese culture and hurt the public's feelings.”

A Caixin reporter foresees future issues with tomb removal, saying legal complications, overall cost of relocation and blowback from citizens could derail the entire campaign.
 

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