(Image Source: Wikimedia Commons)

BY SAMANTHA KUBOTA

ANCHORED BY LAUREN ZIMA

 

Social website Pinterest is covering its behind. The start-up announced Sunday it would provide a bit of code for websites who don’t want their content posted on Pinterest.

Even though normal “pins” show the source for content, secondary sources often lead to possible copyright violations. The copyright issues were made worse by the website’s huge growth over the past year, according to blog LLSocial. The blog also notes “99% of pins are likely in violation of Pinterest’s Terms of Service.”


ReadWriteWeb notes “Pinterest's copyright policies and user agreements have been the subject of debate, with some site publishers and industry observers arguing that Pinterest puts the legal responsibility for policing copyright violations with its more than 10 million users.”


Pinterest tells users on it’s etiqutte page to cite their sources...
“Finding the original source is always preferable to a secondary source such as Google Image Search or a blog entry.”

The website released this bit of code: meta name="pinterest" content="nopin" for websites to block potential pins.

Marketing Land noted that the so-called solution “doesn’t stop the user from downloading the image and then pinning it directly via upload; it only prevents pinning when the URL of the site with the meta tag is involved.”

LLSocial notes it’s unlikely Pinterest will become the new Napster, since it generally drives traffic to the original source.

 

Thanks But No Thanks, Pinterest Allows Websites to Opt-Out

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Feb 21, 2012

Thanks But No Thanks, Pinterest Allows Websites to Opt-Out

(Image Source: Wikimedia Commons)

BY SAMANTHA KUBOTA

ANCHORED BY LAUREN ZIMA

 

Social website Pinterest is covering its behind. The start-up announced Sunday it would provide a bit of code for websites who don’t want their content posted on Pinterest.

Even though normal “pins” show the source for content, secondary sources often lead to possible copyright violations. The copyright issues were made worse by the website’s huge growth over the past year, according to blog LLSocial. The blog also notes “99% of pins are likely in violation of Pinterest’s Terms of Service.”


ReadWriteWeb notes “Pinterest's copyright policies and user agreements have been the subject of debate, with some site publishers and industry observers arguing that Pinterest puts the legal responsibility for policing copyright violations with its more than 10 million users.”


Pinterest tells users on it’s etiqutte page to cite their sources...
“Finding the original source is always preferable to a secondary source such as Google Image Search or a blog entry.”

The website released this bit of code: meta name="pinterest" content="nopin" for websites to block potential pins.

Marketing Land noted that the so-called solution “doesn’t stop the user from downloading the image and then pinning it directly via upload; it only prevents pinning when the URL of the site with the meta tag is involved.”

LLSocial notes it’s unlikely Pinterest will become the new Napster, since it generally drives traffic to the original source.

 

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