(Image source: ABC News)

 

BY MICHAEL COLLINS

 

ANCHOR CARISSA LOETHEN

 

The accidental death of a 6th grader at an Oregon middle school has reignited fears over a dangerous schoolyard practice, the “choking game.” Fox News explains.

 

“They do different things that cause them, basically to be choked. Unfortunately, even when they play this in pairs or groups, people do die from it because they either seizure sometimes, or they don’t wake up.”

 

A study by the Oregon Health Authority estimates around 6% of the state’s 8th grade students have participated in the game — and social media is taking the blame. Kentucky’s WPSD-TV reports … 

 

“Researchers say the game appeals to teens because it doesn't cost anything, and social media sites have images and examples of people who say they enjoy it.”

 

The official website for Choking Game awareness also notes… 

 

“Oxygen deprivation practices are not new. What is new is the speed at which the information transfer occurs. Children growing up with current technology learn about risky behaviors through friends, mutual friends and video sharing website at warp speed.”

 

And ABC News adds... “But YouTube has breathed new life into this dangerous game. Now peer pressure can come from a total stranger.”

 

And according to The Oregonian…

 

“In a 2010 study, researchers found 65 strangulation game videos that totaled more than 173,000 views on YouTube. More than half the videos showed a young person suffering seizures from lack of oxygen.”

 

But the silent epidemic is not only confined to teenagers and high schools. TIME reports one in seven college students has taken part in the potentially lethal “game.”

 

“The potentially lethal Choking Game, which involves cutting off the blood supply to the brain, appears to be popular with some college students who think it's not as dangerous as using illicit drugs.”

Teen's Death Shines Spotlight on 'Choking Game'

by Nathan Giannini
0
Transcript
Apr 16, 2012

Teen's Death Shines Spotlight on 'Choking Game'

(Image source: ABC News)

 

BY MICHAEL COLLINS

 

ANCHOR CARISSA LOETHEN

 

The accidental death of a 6th grader at an Oregon middle school has reignited fears over a dangerous schoolyard practice, the “choking game.” Fox News explains.

 

“They do different things that cause them, basically to be choked. Unfortunately, even when they play this in pairs or groups, people do die from it because they either seizure sometimes, or they don’t wake up.”

 

A study by the Oregon Health Authority estimates around 6% of the state’s 8th grade students have participated in the game — and social media is taking the blame. Kentucky’s WPSD-TV reports … 

 

“Researchers say the game appeals to teens because it doesn't cost anything, and social media sites have images and examples of people who say they enjoy it.”

 

The official website for Choking Game awareness also notes… 

 

“Oxygen deprivation practices are not new. What is new is the speed at which the information transfer occurs. Children growing up with current technology learn about risky behaviors through friends, mutual friends and video sharing website at warp speed.”

 

And ABC News adds... “But YouTube has breathed new life into this dangerous game. Now peer pressure can come from a total stranger.”

 

And according to The Oregonian…

 

“In a 2010 study, researchers found 65 strangulation game videos that totaled more than 173,000 views on YouTube. More than half the videos showed a young person suffering seizures from lack of oxygen.”

 

But the silent epidemic is not only confined to teenagers and high schools. TIME reports one in seven college students has taken part in the potentially lethal “game.”

 

“The potentially lethal Choking Game, which involves cutting off the blood supply to the brain, appears to be popular with some college students who think it's not as dangerous as using illicit drugs.”

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