(Thumbnail image: Gator Zone)

 

An anti-abortion Super Bowl ad featuring former Heisman trophy winner Tim Tebow is sparking a firestorm of reaction in the media.

 

We’re looking at perspectives from MSNBC, The O’Reilly Factor, The Washington Post, ABC News and the Atlanta Journal-Constitution.

 

MSNBC’s Morning Joe discusses the nature of the argument and what options groups who dislike this ad have now.

 

MIKA BRZEZINSKI: “It’s a conversation, I mean run another ad.”

 

WILLIE GEIST: “CBS says they’re going to run the ad. They’re open, as long as they’re responsibly produced, they’re open to advocacy ads, but they’re going to run the Tim Tebow ad.”

 

Media coverage of the ad has become a political debate. Fox News’ Bill O’Reilly defends the ad in a discussion with a former advisor to Hillary Clinton.

 

“If it’s my story, and I’m here to tell it, even if it has a pro-life message, you can’t muzzle that in the United States of America. ...Are you offended that Tim Tebow’s alive?!”

 

An opinion post by Jonathan Capehart of the Washington Post says the message of the ad is not what Focus on the Family actually advocates. 

 

“Focus on the Family is touting Ms. Tebow's right to choose while trying to deny the same opportunity -- the same right -- to other women.”

 

ABC News adds that it may just be the time and place that’s wrong for this ad, not the nature of it.

 

“And many sports fans say that is a great shame, that what has been a day for Americans to come together over football could become yet another day where we are divided over politics and the culture war. ”

 

Jay Bookman, a columnist at the Atlanta Journal-Constitution, says he’s more concerned with CBS applying their new policy fairly across the board.

 

“The question of fairness is legitimate … The previous policy — designed not to offend anybody — never really made sense anyway, not in an advertising culture where discussion of four-hour erections and urinary problems have become standard.”

 

Do you think CBS will allow opposing advocacy ads during the super bowl?

 

Writer: Erika Roberts

Producer: Charlie McKeague

 

 

Tebow’s Superbowl Ad Causing Controversy

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Jan 28, 2010

Tebow’s Superbowl Ad Causing Controversy

(Thumbnail image: Gator Zone)

 

An anti-abortion Super Bowl ad featuring former Heisman trophy winner Tim Tebow is sparking a firestorm of reaction in the media.

 

We’re looking at perspectives from MSNBC, The O’Reilly Factor, The Washington Post, ABC News and the Atlanta Journal-Constitution.

 

MSNBC’s Morning Joe discusses the nature of the argument and what options groups who dislike this ad have now.

 

MIKA BRZEZINSKI: “It’s a conversation, I mean run another ad.”

 

WILLIE GEIST: “CBS says they’re going to run the ad. They’re open, as long as they’re responsibly produced, they’re open to advocacy ads, but they’re going to run the Tim Tebow ad.”

 

Media coverage of the ad has become a political debate. Fox News’ Bill O’Reilly defends the ad in a discussion with a former advisor to Hillary Clinton.

 

“If it’s my story, and I’m here to tell it, even if it has a pro-life message, you can’t muzzle that in the United States of America. ...Are you offended that Tim Tebow’s alive?!”

 

An opinion post by Jonathan Capehart of the Washington Post says the message of the ad is not what Focus on the Family actually advocates. 

 

“Focus on the Family is touting Ms. Tebow's right to choose while trying to deny the same opportunity -- the same right -- to other women.”

 

ABC News adds that it may just be the time and place that’s wrong for this ad, not the nature of it.

 

“And many sports fans say that is a great shame, that what has been a day for Americans to come together over football could become yet another day where we are divided over politics and the culture war. ”

 

Jay Bookman, a columnist at the Atlanta Journal-Constitution, says he’s more concerned with CBS applying their new policy fairly across the board.

 

“The question of fairness is legitimate … The previous policy — designed not to offend anybody — never really made sense anyway, not in an advertising culture where discussion of four-hour erections and urinary problems have become standard.”

 

Do you think CBS will allow opposing advocacy ads during the super bowl?

 

Writer: Erika Roberts

Producer: Charlie McKeague

 

 

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