BY ZACH TOOMBS

 

 

After a week of speculation over the Supreme Court ruling on health care reform, Democrats took to the Sunday shows to tamper down skepticism. Here’s Vice President Joe Biden on CBS' Face the Nation.

 

“First, I think we should bring the temperature down. No one has made any money betting on [the] outcome of cases based on oral arguments and the questions asked.”

 

And New York Democratic Senator Chuck Schumer warned ...

 

“If they were to throw out the health care law, things like Medicare, Social Security, food safety laws could be in jeopardy on the very same ground.”

 

But Politico says Schumer has more than just the court’s opinion to worry about.

 

“Democrats still face an uphill battle on the law in the court of public opinion, with the show’s substitute host Savannah Guthrie noting that two-thirds of the country opposes it according to recent survey.”

 

And RealClearPolitics says Schumer’s comments are part of a growing trend, writing:

 

“One Democratic member of Congress told reporters Thursday that if the court were to strike down the law, doing so could create chaos and would raise some serious questions, including: ‘Can our country govern itself?’ And, the lawmaker surmised, ‘I don’t know if the court wants to cause that firestorm.’”

 

Meanwhile, on CNN’s State of the Union, House Budget Committee Chairman Paul Ryan backtracked on comments he made last week — when he said military personnel who called President Obama’s budget plan strategy-driven were being dishonest.

 

CROWLEY: “The military’s a little offended by your words.”

RYAN: “I really misspoke, to be candid with you, Candy. I didn’t mean to make that kind of an impression … We just believe that what we got from the White House was more of a budget-driven strategy, not a strategy-driven budget.”

 

Just a week after picking up Ryan’s endorsement and just days ahead of Tuesday’s primary, GOP presidential frontrunner Mitt Romney received the support of another Wisconsin congressman — junior Senator Ron Johnson.

 

“I never did intend to endorse anybody, but I've had the opportunity to meet with Gov. Romney over the last couple weeks ... I’ve come away from those conversations fully convinced that Gov. Romney is the person to lead our party, to lead our nation.”

 

The Washington Post says Johnson’s endorsement is especially valuable for Romney because the Wisconsin senator identifies with a typically anti-Romney demographic, writing:

 

Johnson’s endorsement of Romney gives the former Massachusetts governor the backing of a member of the Senate’s new guard, an up-and-coming freshman who is popular with tea-party supporters.

 

Romney also received some vocal support from Senate Minority leader Mitch McConnell, who stopped short of an endorsement but said it’s time to turn the focus on Mr. Obama.  

 

“It’s time to turn our attention to the fall campaign and begin to make the case against the president of the United States.”

 

But, on Meet the Press, Romney’s main challenger — former Senator Rick Santorum — says he’s in for the long haul.

 

“Without a doubt, if he’s at that number, we’ll step aside. Right now, he’s not there. He’s not even close to it. Like I said, less than half the delegates have been selected. We got a long way to go, and we’re going to fight the fight.”

 

Despite Santorum’s resilience, The New York Times says neither candidates’ comments are entirely accurate — it depends on who’s counting and whether unbound delegates are included.

 

“… more than half the states have held their nominating contests. By most counts, Mr. Romney has accumulated more than half of the 1,144 delegates needed to claim the nomination, and he has twice as many delegates as Mr. Santorum has.”

 

Sunday Soundbite Analysis 4/01

by Zach Toombs
0
Transcript
Apr 1, 2012

Sunday Soundbite Analysis 4/01

 

BY ZACH TOOMBS

 

 

After a week of speculation over the Supreme Court ruling on health care reform, Democrats took to the Sunday shows to tamper down skepticism. Here’s Vice President Joe Biden on CBS' Face the Nation.

 

“First, I think we should bring the temperature down. No one has made any money betting on [the] outcome of cases based on oral arguments and the questions asked.”

 

And New York Democratic Senator Chuck Schumer warned ...

 

“If they were to throw out the health care law, things like Medicare, Social Security, food safety laws could be in jeopardy on the very same ground.”

 

But Politico says Schumer has more than just the court’s opinion to worry about.

 

“Democrats still face an uphill battle on the law in the court of public opinion, with the show’s substitute host Savannah Guthrie noting that two-thirds of the country opposes it according to recent survey.”

 

And RealClearPolitics says Schumer’s comments are part of a growing trend, writing:

 

“One Democratic member of Congress told reporters Thursday that if the court were to strike down the law, doing so could create chaos and would raise some serious questions, including: ‘Can our country govern itself?’ And, the lawmaker surmised, ‘I don’t know if the court wants to cause that firestorm.’”

 

Meanwhile, on CNN’s State of the Union, House Budget Committee Chairman Paul Ryan backtracked on comments he made last week — when he said military personnel who called President Obama’s budget plan strategy-driven were being dishonest.

 

CROWLEY: “The military’s a little offended by your words.”

RYAN: “I really misspoke, to be candid with you, Candy. I didn’t mean to make that kind of an impression … We just believe that what we got from the White House was more of a budget-driven strategy, not a strategy-driven budget.”

 

Just a week after picking up Ryan’s endorsement and just days ahead of Tuesday’s primary, GOP presidential frontrunner Mitt Romney received the support of another Wisconsin congressman — junior Senator Ron Johnson.

 

“I never did intend to endorse anybody, but I've had the opportunity to meet with Gov. Romney over the last couple weeks ... I’ve come away from those conversations fully convinced that Gov. Romney is the person to lead our party, to lead our nation.”

 

The Washington Post says Johnson’s endorsement is especially valuable for Romney because the Wisconsin senator identifies with a typically anti-Romney demographic, writing:

 

Johnson’s endorsement of Romney gives the former Massachusetts governor the backing of a member of the Senate’s new guard, an up-and-coming freshman who is popular with tea-party supporters.

 

Romney also received some vocal support from Senate Minority leader Mitch McConnell, who stopped short of an endorsement but said it’s time to turn the focus on Mr. Obama.  

 

“It’s time to turn our attention to the fall campaign and begin to make the case against the president of the United States.”

 

But, on Meet the Press, Romney’s main challenger — former Senator Rick Santorum — says he’s in for the long haul.

 

“Without a doubt, if he’s at that number, we’ll step aside. Right now, he’s not there. He’s not even close to it. Like I said, less than half the delegates have been selected. We got a long way to go, and we’re going to fight the fight.”

 

Despite Santorum’s resilience, The New York Times says neither candidates’ comments are entirely accurate — it depends on who’s counting and whether unbound delegates are included.

 

“… more than half the states have held their nominating contests. By most counts, Mr. Romney has accumulated more than half of the 1,144 delegates needed to claim the nomination, and he has twice as many delegates as Mr. Santorum has.”

 

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