(Image Source: TIME)

 

BY GRACE MEINERS

 

You're watching multisource health news from Newsy

A new study shows what would happen to your wallet, and your waistline, if a tax on soda and sugary drinks were imposed.

The study, published in the Archives of Internal Medicine, says a 20 percent tax would cause an average weight loss of .7 pounds per year, and a 40 percent tax would result in an average yearly weight loss of 1.3 pounds. (Video: KATU)

The study comes as a national debate continues over the merits of “sin taxes” -- on items like cigarettes, alcohol, and sugary foods and drinks. The tax would cost the average household $28 a year, and WBBM in Chicago suggests there might be a better way to tax soda drinkers.

“Researchers found adding up to a forty percent tax on high-calorie soft drinks would only cut on average 13 calories a day to a person’s diet. Experts say it would be a better idea to tax the owners of restaurants and vending machines instead."

Fox Business says although a forty percent tax would raise $2.5 billion each year, the numbers on the scale won’t decrease by much. And here’s why:

“It’s because people don’t stop drinking these drinks if you tax them. Rich folks keep drinking them. Lower-income Americans just buy in bulk or switch to generic.”

Study author Eric Finkelstein says it makes sense to tax soda and sugary drinks because government subsidies provided to corn and soybean farmers keep the price of high fructose corn syrup artificially below market prices.

“But if you target just one of them, then you'll have a very modest effect on consumption, so it seems hard to justify taxes on sweetened beverages and not on candy or sugared cereal as well.”

But Portland’s KATU wonders if a tax like this were imposed, would it last?

“But these so-called sin taxes aren’t popular. Last month, Washington state voters appealed the taxes on soda and candy passed by the legislature.”

The study’s author is conducting a follow-up study comparing the effect of taxing densely-sugared food in addition to soda.

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Study Questions Effectiveness of Soda Tax

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Dec 15, 2010

Study Questions Effectiveness of Soda Tax

(Image Source: TIME)

 

BY GRACE MEINERS

 

You're watching multisource health news from Newsy

A new study shows what would happen to your wallet, and your waistline, if a tax on soda and sugary drinks were imposed.

The study, published in the Archives of Internal Medicine, says a 20 percent tax would cause an average weight loss of .7 pounds per year, and a 40 percent tax would result in an average yearly weight loss of 1.3 pounds. (Video: KATU)

The study comes as a national debate continues over the merits of “sin taxes” -- on items like cigarettes, alcohol, and sugary foods and drinks. The tax would cost the average household $28 a year, and WBBM in Chicago suggests there might be a better way to tax soda drinkers.

“Researchers found adding up to a forty percent tax on high-calorie soft drinks would only cut on average 13 calories a day to a person’s diet. Experts say it would be a better idea to tax the owners of restaurants and vending machines instead."

Fox Business says although a forty percent tax would raise $2.5 billion each year, the numbers on the scale won’t decrease by much. And here’s why:

“It’s because people don’t stop drinking these drinks if you tax them. Rich folks keep drinking them. Lower-income Americans just buy in bulk or switch to generic.”

Study author Eric Finkelstein says it makes sense to tax soda and sugary drinks because government subsidies provided to corn and soybean farmers keep the price of high fructose corn syrup artificially below market prices.

“But if you target just one of them, then you'll have a very modest effect on consumption, so it seems hard to justify taxes on sweetened beverages and not on candy or sugared cereal as well.”

But Portland’s KATU wonders if a tax like this were imposed, would it last?

“But these so-called sin taxes aren’t popular. Last month, Washington state voters appealed the taxes on soda and candy passed by the legislature.”

The study’s author is conducting a follow-up study comparing the effect of taxing densely-sugared food in addition to soda.

Get more multisource video news analysis from Newsy

Transcript by Newsy

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