(Thumbnail Image: Equal Writes)

 

BY TRACY PFEIFFER


A new study suggests if the United States wants to decrease unwanted pregnancy and STIs among teenagers, it should take a look at how parents in the Netherlands handle budding teenage sexuality: romantic sleepovers. (Video: HLN)

The study, posted on Contexts.org, explains the Dutch approach to sexual education.

“Dutch parents... downplay the dangerous and difficult sides of teenage sexuality... They speak of readiness... a process of becoming physically and emotionally ready for sex that they believe young people can self-regulate, provided they've been encouraged to pace themselves.”

The study says in 2007, teen births in the United States were eight times as high as in the Netherlands despite America’s focus on abstinence.  Sociological Images provides one explanation for the disparity:

“Most American teenagers hide their virginity loss from their parents... often without protection against pregnancy or sexually transmitted infections (STIs).  In contrast, most Dutch teenagers lose their virginity in their own bedrooms with their parents approval… and condoms.”

And a writer for Change.org brings up another issue between the two parenting methods:

“...the Dutch seem far more likely to validate their teen’s romantic feelings, whereas American parents tend to trivialize those emotions as ‘puppy love.’”

A blogger on The Stir says she supports the idea of romantic sleepovers for teens--and more.

“...being sex positive allows teens to take control of their own sexuality. Making decisions from a place of love instead of fear is always the right choice.  Of course teens in the Netherlands also have health care and access to birth control, something that all American kids do not. Which is shameful.”

But anchors on HLN were feeling more amused than swayed by the study.

 

“How about ‘no’? There’s my view.”
“My mother wouldn’t put up with it.  She wouldn’t put up with it right now at the age I am, much less as a teenager.”
“I pictured little kids.  Maybe that’s me thinking of the innocent days of the sleepover with the Scoobie Doo sleeping bag, saying, ‘Bye Mom! Going on a romantic sleepover.’ It just wouldn’t work.”


So what do you think?  Do the Dutch have the right idea, or are romantic sleepovers too much to justify?

Study: Dutch 'Romantic Sleepovers' Prevents Teen Pregnancy

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Sep 10, 2010

Study: Dutch 'Romantic Sleepovers' Prevents Teen Pregnancy

(Thumbnail Image: Equal Writes)

 

BY TRACY PFEIFFER


A new study suggests if the United States wants to decrease unwanted pregnancy and STIs among teenagers, it should take a look at how parents in the Netherlands handle budding teenage sexuality: romantic sleepovers. (Video: HLN)

The study, posted on Contexts.org, explains the Dutch approach to sexual education.

“Dutch parents... downplay the dangerous and difficult sides of teenage sexuality... They speak of readiness... a process of becoming physically and emotionally ready for sex that they believe young people can self-regulate, provided they've been encouraged to pace themselves.”

The study says in 2007, teen births in the United States were eight times as high as in the Netherlands despite America’s focus on abstinence.  Sociological Images provides one explanation for the disparity:

“Most American teenagers hide their virginity loss from their parents... often without protection against pregnancy or sexually transmitted infections (STIs).  In contrast, most Dutch teenagers lose their virginity in their own bedrooms with their parents approval… and condoms.”

And a writer for Change.org brings up another issue between the two parenting methods:

“...the Dutch seem far more likely to validate their teen’s romantic feelings, whereas American parents tend to trivialize those emotions as ‘puppy love.’”

A blogger on The Stir says she supports the idea of romantic sleepovers for teens--and more.

“...being sex positive allows teens to take control of their own sexuality. Making decisions from a place of love instead of fear is always the right choice.  Of course teens in the Netherlands also have health care and access to birth control, something that all American kids do not. Which is shameful.”

But anchors on HLN were feeling more amused than swayed by the study.

 

“How about ‘no’? There’s my view.”
“My mother wouldn’t put up with it.  She wouldn’t put up with it right now at the age I am, much less as a teenager.”
“I pictured little kids.  Maybe that’s me thinking of the innocent days of the sleepover with the Scoobie Doo sleeping bag, saying, ‘Bye Mom! Going on a romantic sleepover.’ It just wouldn’t work.”


So what do you think?  Do the Dutch have the right idea, or are romantic sleepovers too much to justify?

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