(Image Source: CNN/JIMAR)

 

BY JIM FLINK

ANCHOR CHRISTIAN BRYANT

Almost everyone knows -- sharks and humans don’t always mix.  But it’s not the sharks to fear.
A new study says -- when human populations rise around shark infested waters, it’s the sharks that suffer.
Here’s the Daily Beast.

“ … scientists say that sharks fare far better in areas of the ocean where human fishing activity is minimal. In areas with no or few humans, sharks were recorded in populations of up to 337 per square mile, a number that dropped to about 26 per square mile near the Hawaiian Islands and Samoa.”

Scientists say that represents a 90 percent population decline -- across the Pacific of a group known generally as reef sharks.

This research is coming from a group of North American scientists who have published their findings in the latest issue of the journal Conservation Biology.

Which might indicate why they are so concerned about the effects of fishing on reef sharks.
The Washington Post has more...

“The team of eight scientists examined the results of a decade of underwater surveys across 46 Pacific islands and atolls, and found densities of reef sharks — gray, whitetip and blacktip reef sharks as well as Galapagos and tawny nurse sharks — “increased substantially as human population decreased” and the productivity and temperature of the ocean increased.”

Now to the science of the data. CNN says, the method might sound a little weird.


“The estimates were gathered using “towed-dive surveys” where paired SCUBA divers record shark sightings while being towed behind a small boat. It’s a method which provides a more accurate census of mobile reef fish like sharks over large areas...”
http://www.cnn.com/2012/04/28/world/shark-pacific-reef-plummet/index.html?npt=NP1

This latest study forms part of the U.S.’s National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s -- or NOAA’s -- Pacific Reef Assessment and Monitoring Program.



(SOC)

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Study: As Humans Go Up, Sharks Go Down

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Apr 28, 2012

Study: As Humans Go Up, Sharks Go Down

 

(Image Source: CNN/JIMAR)

 

BY JIM FLINK

ANCHOR CHRISTIAN BRYANT

Almost everyone knows -- sharks and humans don’t always mix.  But it’s not the sharks to fear.
A new study says -- when human populations rise around shark infested waters, it’s the sharks that suffer.
Here’s the Daily Beast.

“ … scientists say that sharks fare far better in areas of the ocean where human fishing activity is minimal. In areas with no or few humans, sharks were recorded in populations of up to 337 per square mile, a number that dropped to about 26 per square mile near the Hawaiian Islands and Samoa.”

Scientists say that represents a 90 percent population decline -- across the Pacific of a group known generally as reef sharks.

This research is coming from a group of North American scientists who have published their findings in the latest issue of the journal Conservation Biology.

Which might indicate why they are so concerned about the effects of fishing on reef sharks.
The Washington Post has more...

“The team of eight scientists examined the results of a decade of underwater surveys across 46 Pacific islands and atolls, and found densities of reef sharks — gray, whitetip and blacktip reef sharks as well as Galapagos and tawny nurse sharks — “increased substantially as human population decreased” and the productivity and temperature of the ocean increased.”

Now to the science of the data. CNN says, the method might sound a little weird.


“The estimates were gathered using “towed-dive surveys” where paired SCUBA divers record shark sightings while being towed behind a small boat. It’s a method which provides a more accurate census of mobile reef fish like sharks over large areas...”
http://www.cnn.com/2012/04/28/world/shark-pacific-reef-plummet/index.html?npt=NP1

This latest study forms part of the U.S.’s National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s -- or NOAA’s -- Pacific Reef Assessment and Monitoring Program.



(SOC)

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