(Image source: Flickr / Hamed Saber)

 


BY JASMINE BAILEY

 

 

A new worldwide study shows stroke is more prevalent in younger people than previously suspected and at what analysts are calling a startling rate.

 

“Twenty-five percent increase in those between 20 and 64 years old. That would be from the past 20 years. … Premature death and disability, they say, will double by 2030.” (Via CTV)

 

“And when we look at the 2010 numbers globally, 31 percent were in children, and they consider a child 20 years of age and under.”

“Oh, my gosh. That’s unbelievable.” (Via WTVT)

 

That seems to be the shared reaction to the study done by AUT University in New Zealand.

 

So what are some of the reasons for stroke in younger people? Well, most notably, high blood pressure caused by bad health habits. Some of those factors include obesity, smoking, unhealthy food and stress. (Via Wikimedia Commons / Centers for Disease Control and Prevention / Fj.toloza992 / Vaikunda Raja / Dalton ScavassaFlickr / stuartpilbrow)

 

“One of the study authors had said, you know, when you’re young, you think youre going to live forever, and ‘Oh, if I’m doing something not healthy now, I’m going to be OK later on.’ But maybe not.” (Via WLNY)

 

The study compared countries across the globe by income and found the majority of issues occur in middle- and lower-income countries. A reporter for Al Jazeera talked to officials in India, where doctors say, “We are seeing more and more stroke in India, almost three times what I used to see 20 years ago, so it’s a major problem, and it’s in quite epidemic proportions.”

 

Of the 16.9 million stoke cases worldwide in 2010, 69 percent occurred in low-income and middle-income countries; 71 percent of 5.9 million stroke deaths were in the same places of the world. The reason — less ability for prevention and minimal care for sufferers. (Via The Times of India)

 

And researchers say this reality will become a growing burden if better methods of care are not adopted. In a statement, the director of the National Institute for Stroke and Applied Neurosciences at AUT University said: “The worldwide stroke burden is growing very fast. … And there is now an urgent need for culturally acceptable and affordable stroke prevention, management and rehabilitation strategies to be developed and implemented worldwide.” (Via Everyday Health)

 

The U.K.’s Stroke Association chief executive told Sky News “this is a stark warning” and should be a “wake-up call to governments across the globe.

 

If the growing numbers continue, it’s estimated stroke costs could top $183 billion worldwide by 2030.

Stroke Numbers Growing Among Young People

by Jasmine Bailey
0
Transcript
Oct 24, 2013

Stroke Numbers Growing Among Young People

(Image source: Flickr / Hamed Saber)

 


BY JASMINE BAILEY

 

 

A new worldwide study shows stroke is more prevalent in younger people than previously suspected and at what analysts are calling a startling rate.

 

“Twenty-five percent increase in those between 20 and 64 years old. That would be from the past 20 years. … Premature death and disability, they say, will double by 2030.” (Via CTV)

 

“And when we look at the 2010 numbers globally, 31 percent were in children, and they consider a child 20 years of age and under.”

“Oh, my gosh. That’s unbelievable.” (Via WTVT)

 

That seems to be the shared reaction to the study done by AUT University in New Zealand.

 

So what are some of the reasons for stroke in younger people? Well, most notably, high blood pressure caused by bad health habits. Some of those factors include obesity, smoking, unhealthy food and stress. (Via Wikimedia Commons / Centers for Disease Control and Prevention / Fj.toloza992 / Vaikunda Raja / Dalton ScavassaFlickr / stuartpilbrow)

 

“One of the study authors had said, you know, when you’re young, you think youre going to live forever, and ‘Oh, if I’m doing something not healthy now, I’m going to be OK later on.’ But maybe not.” (Via WLNY)

 

The study compared countries across the globe by income and found the majority of issues occur in middle- and lower-income countries. A reporter for Al Jazeera talked to officials in India, where doctors say, “We are seeing more and more stroke in India, almost three times what I used to see 20 years ago, so it’s a major problem, and it’s in quite epidemic proportions.”

 

Of the 16.9 million stoke cases worldwide in 2010, 69 percent occurred in low-income and middle-income countries; 71 percent of 5.9 million stroke deaths were in the same places of the world. The reason — less ability for prevention and minimal care for sufferers. (Via The Times of India)

 

And researchers say this reality will become a growing burden if better methods of care are not adopted. In a statement, the director of the National Institute for Stroke and Applied Neurosciences at AUT University said: “The worldwide stroke burden is growing very fast. … And there is now an urgent need for culturally acceptable and affordable stroke prevention, management and rehabilitation strategies to be developed and implemented worldwide.” (Via Everyday Health)

 

The U.K.’s Stroke Association chief executive told Sky News “this is a stark warning” and should be a “wake-up call to governments across the globe.

 

If the growing numbers continue, it’s estimated stroke costs could top $183 billion worldwide by 2030.

View More
Comments
Newsy
www3