(Image Source: The Inquisitr)

 

BY LOGAN TITTLE

 

More than 20 states are considering drug testing welfare recipients.

Supporters say they’re protecting taxpayer dollars — but critics question the justification.

First to Georgia — where the Senate recently passed the controversial legislation. WGCL explains.

 

“The bill’s supporters say the goal is to make sure people don’t spend state money on illegal drugs…”

 

Virginia, Wyoming, Texas and Florida are among other states that have recently debated the legislation’s merits. Utah State Senator Aaron Osmond says the bill he’s sponsoring will be good for those who need help with drug abuse. Here’s KSTU.

 

“It’s important to understand that this bill doesn’t limit them, or keep them or their family from receiving benefits. It enables them to access drug treatment and continue to receive these benefits along the way.”

 

But critics argue mandating drug tests isn’t even necessary. WFTV notes...

 

“Initial evidence shows few positive tests. The Department of Transportation with more than 6,000 employees only had two positive tests over 500 done.”

 

And KTVT spoke with a Texas Democrat who calls the moves a “slippery slope.”

 

REP. ELLIOT NAISHTAT (D-Austin): “When you're stigmatizing or scapegoating, poor people but next it could be veterans, next it could be college students.”

 

The CBS-affiliate also points out the cost for Texas taxpayers...

 

“Drug testing at $10 each could cost the state some $3 million a year.”

 

Others are concerned the bill might be unfair to those already struggling. WAGA has more.

 

“…we need to require these individuals to seek some sort of professional development because of the circumstances that they are in presently...That is just wrong.”

 

In a letter to the editor of USA Today — one reader says if fairness is such an issue—what’s wrong with making it a requirement?

 

“The preposterous notion ... that requiring drug tests before and during receipt of public assistance ‘unfairly stigmatize people receiving public assistance’ is a joke. If it's about being ‘fair,’ then let's be fair to those employed who are providing the money for the assistance...”

 

A federal judge recently ordered Florida to stop implementing its recently passed drug testing law which is similar to what other states are thinking about implementing.

States Consider Drug Testing Welfare Recipients

by Logan Tittle
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Transcript
Mar 10, 2012

States Consider Drug Testing Welfare Recipients

 

(Image Source: The Inquisitr)

 

BY LOGAN TITTLE

 

More than 20 states are considering drug testing welfare recipients.

Supporters say they’re protecting taxpayer dollars — but critics question the justification.

First to Georgia — where the Senate recently passed the controversial legislation. WGCL explains.

 

“The bill’s supporters say the goal is to make sure people don’t spend state money on illegal drugs…”

 

Virginia, Wyoming, Texas and Florida are among other states that have recently debated the legislation’s merits. Utah State Senator Aaron Osmond says the bill he’s sponsoring will be good for those who need help with drug abuse. Here’s KSTU.

 

“It’s important to understand that this bill doesn’t limit them, or keep them or their family from receiving benefits. It enables them to access drug treatment and continue to receive these benefits along the way.”

 

But critics argue mandating drug tests isn’t even necessary. WFTV notes...

 

“Initial evidence shows few positive tests. The Department of Transportation with more than 6,000 employees only had two positive tests over 500 done.”

 

And KTVT spoke with a Texas Democrat who calls the moves a “slippery slope.”

 

REP. ELLIOT NAISHTAT (D-Austin): “When you're stigmatizing or scapegoating, poor people but next it could be veterans, next it could be college students.”

 

The CBS-affiliate also points out the cost for Texas taxpayers...

 

“Drug testing at $10 each could cost the state some $3 million a year.”

 

Others are concerned the bill might be unfair to those already struggling. WAGA has more.

 

“…we need to require these individuals to seek some sort of professional development because of the circumstances that they are in presently...That is just wrong.”

 

In a letter to the editor of USA Today — one reader says if fairness is such an issue—what’s wrong with making it a requirement?

 

“The preposterous notion ... that requiring drug tests before and during receipt of public assistance ‘unfairly stigmatize people receiving public assistance’ is a joke. If it's about being ‘fair,’ then let's be fair to those employed who are providing the money for the assistance...”

 

A federal judge recently ordered Florida to stop implementing its recently passed drug testing law which is similar to what other states are thinking about implementing.

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