(Image Source: Mashable)

BY LUCAS GEISLER

ANCHOR ANA COMPAIN-ROMERO

New York City--the final frontier.  That’s the case for one now-retired ship.

The U.S. space shuttle Enterprise flew over New York City on the back of a Boeing 747.  The visit is in celebration of the end of NASA’s shuttle program. 

(Images Source: Mashable)

Enterprise will make its home this June in New York City on the Intrepid Sea, Air, and Space Museum, a World War II aircraft carrier-turned-museum.  Museum president Susan Marenoff-Zausner tells CNN...

“'This is going to be the largest NASA artifact north of Baltimore in the entire Northeast region.  For kids to be able to come and see this when they'd have to travel miles and miles to go somewhere else, it's right in their backyard.'”

New Yorkers gathered throughout the city to watch its latest addition make its fly-over.  Resident Kenneth Irvin tells Space.com...

"’I'm glad New York was able to get it up here.  I know there was a battle about which city it should go to, so I'm very glad New York got it.'"

Built in 1976, Enterprise served as a test shuttle, used for takeoff and landing tests.  Although it never took a mission to outer space, Kevin Hall of DVice argues, it’s still important. 

(Video Source: NASA)

“The whole point of the shuttle program was that it would provide what no other space agency had before it: a reusable spacecraft to ferry humans to and from orbit. If we could launch a shuttle up like a rocket, Enterprise proved we could land one like a plane.”

But it wouldn’t be a proper ceremony for the Enterprise, without an appearance from one of its “original” namesake crew members.

Leonard Nimoy, the man who played Dr. Spock on that other Enterprise – the Starship Enterprise – was present at the event, and recalled the backstory behind NASA’s version.

"When this ship was first built, it was named the Constitution.  ‘Star Trek' fans can be very persuasive. They sent a lot of letters to President Gerlad Ford, and the president logically decided that the ship should be named after our spaceship Enterprise."

Along with the Enterprise in New York, the three remaining space shuttles will live long and prosper in permanent displays across the country.  Space shuttle Discovery was installed last week at the Smithsonian in Washington D.C., the Endeavor will head to Los Angeles this fall, and the Atlantis will make home at the Kennedy Space Center in Florida.

(Image Sources: Washington Times, LA Times, International Business Times)
 

Space Shuttle Enterprise Flies Over New York City

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Apr 28, 2012

Space Shuttle Enterprise Flies Over New York City

(Image Source: Mashable)

BY LUCAS GEISLER

ANCHOR ANA COMPAIN-ROMERO

New York City--the final frontier.  That’s the case for one now-retired ship.

The U.S. space shuttle Enterprise flew over New York City on the back of a Boeing 747.  The visit is in celebration of the end of NASA’s shuttle program. 

(Images Source: Mashable)

Enterprise will make its home this June in New York City on the Intrepid Sea, Air, and Space Museum, a World War II aircraft carrier-turned-museum.  Museum president Susan Marenoff-Zausner tells CNN...

“'This is going to be the largest NASA artifact north of Baltimore in the entire Northeast region.  For kids to be able to come and see this when they'd have to travel miles and miles to go somewhere else, it's right in their backyard.'”

New Yorkers gathered throughout the city to watch its latest addition make its fly-over.  Resident Kenneth Irvin tells Space.com...

"’I'm glad New York was able to get it up here.  I know there was a battle about which city it should go to, so I'm very glad New York got it.'"

Built in 1976, Enterprise served as a test shuttle, used for takeoff and landing tests.  Although it never took a mission to outer space, Kevin Hall of DVice argues, it’s still important. 

(Video Source: NASA)

“The whole point of the shuttle program was that it would provide what no other space agency had before it: a reusable spacecraft to ferry humans to and from orbit. If we could launch a shuttle up like a rocket, Enterprise proved we could land one like a plane.”

But it wouldn’t be a proper ceremony for the Enterprise, without an appearance from one of its “original” namesake crew members.

Leonard Nimoy, the man who played Dr. Spock on that other Enterprise – the Starship Enterprise – was present at the event, and recalled the backstory behind NASA’s version.

"When this ship was first built, it was named the Constitution.  ‘Star Trek' fans can be very persuasive. They sent a lot of letters to President Gerlad Ford, and the president logically decided that the ship should be named after our spaceship Enterprise."

Along with the Enterprise in New York, the three remaining space shuttles will live long and prosper in permanent displays across the country.  Space shuttle Discovery was installed last week at the Smithsonian in Washington D.C., the Endeavor will head to Los Angeles this fall, and the Atlantis will make home at the Kennedy Space Center in Florida.

(Image Sources: Washington Times, LA Times, International Business Times)
 

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