(Image Source: Press TV

 

BY AUSTIN ALONZO

ANCHOR ZACH TOOMBS


The Sudanese government is claiming victory over South Sudan after South Sudanese forces withdrew from a disputed oil-producing area.

Al Jazeera reports newly-independent South Sudan says it withdrew forces from Heglig in the disputed borderland region of Abyei in response to international pressure. The Sudanese government says it fought and won to drive the South out.

“The latest flare up in violence, the worst since the two countries split, suspended African Union-sponsored talks to resolve issues like the demarcation of borders and oil sharing revenues, which could reignite the conflict.” 

Crowds celebrated the news in the Sudanese capital of Khartoum as President Omar al-Bashir announced his intention to keep up the pressure by ending the export of southern oil through the north, a move euronews says could harm both nations.

“The countries are at loggerheads over their border and other disputes that already halted nearly all the oil production, underpinning both economies.”

The BBC reports South Sudan invaded Heglig last week in response to northern aggression launched from the area, and still considers it part of southern Sudan.

“South Sudan issued a statement saying it was not interested in war with its northern neighbour …  President Salva Kiir said the South still believed that Heglig was a part of South Sudan and that its final status should be determined by international arbitration”

Khartoum, on the other hand, considers itself at war with South Sudan over Abyei, according to The New York Times.

“...a Sudanese government spokesman, said Thursday that his nation was ‘fed up’ with South Sudan’s leaders and would ‘make them learn a lesson’ for seizing Heglig. ... [He said] the two nations were now back at war.”

On Saturday, President Obama, in a video message directed to the people of both nations said that conflict was not inevitable, calling for an end to military actions and urging leadership to negotiate peacefully.

"The only way to achieve real and lasting security is to resolve your differences through negotiation. ... You will never be at peace if your neighbor feels threatened. You will never see development if your neighbor refuses to be your partner in trade and commerce."

The growing conflict has also drawn international condemnation from the African Union and United Nations Security Council, who urge both sides to negotiate peacefully.

South Sudanese Troops Withdraw from Disputed Oil Region

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Apr 22, 2012

South Sudanese Troops Withdraw from Disputed Oil Region

(Image Source: Press TV

 

BY AUSTIN ALONZO

ANCHOR ZACH TOOMBS


The Sudanese government is claiming victory over South Sudan after South Sudanese forces withdrew from a disputed oil-producing area.

Al Jazeera reports newly-independent South Sudan says it withdrew forces from Heglig in the disputed borderland region of Abyei in response to international pressure. The Sudanese government says it fought and won to drive the South out.

“The latest flare up in violence, the worst since the two countries split, suspended African Union-sponsored talks to resolve issues like the demarcation of borders and oil sharing revenues, which could reignite the conflict.” 

Crowds celebrated the news in the Sudanese capital of Khartoum as President Omar al-Bashir announced his intention to keep up the pressure by ending the export of southern oil through the north, a move euronews says could harm both nations.

“The countries are at loggerheads over their border and other disputes that already halted nearly all the oil production, underpinning both economies.”

The BBC reports South Sudan invaded Heglig last week in response to northern aggression launched from the area, and still considers it part of southern Sudan.

“South Sudan issued a statement saying it was not interested in war with its northern neighbour …  President Salva Kiir said the South still believed that Heglig was a part of South Sudan and that its final status should be determined by international arbitration”

Khartoum, on the other hand, considers itself at war with South Sudan over Abyei, according to The New York Times.

“...a Sudanese government spokesman, said Thursday that his nation was ‘fed up’ with South Sudan’s leaders and would ‘make them learn a lesson’ for seizing Heglig. ... [He said] the two nations were now back at war.”

On Saturday, President Obama, in a video message directed to the people of both nations said that conflict was not inevitable, calling for an end to military actions and urging leadership to negotiate peacefully.

"The only way to achieve real and lasting security is to resolve your differences through negotiation. ... You will never be at peace if your neighbor feels threatened. You will never see development if your neighbor refuses to be your partner in trade and commerce."

The growing conflict has also drawn international condemnation from the African Union and United Nations Security Council, who urge both sides to negotiate peacefully.

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