(Image source: TIME Magazine)  

 

BY ELIZABETH HAGEDORN

ANCHOR BRICE SANDER

 
Voting began Wednesday morning in the South Korean presidential election which pit the daughter of a former dictator against the liberal son of a North Korean refugee. Here’s CNN with the latest.

“Both candidates are highlighting the negative aspects of their rivals’ pasts, while focusing on the positives of their own, and both are hoping that the ghosts of presidents past will help propel them to the Blue House."

Known as Madame Park by her supporters, the conservative Park Geun-hye has spent much of the campaign trying to distance herself from her father’s regime -- a former South Korean president credited with developing the economy following the Korean War but more widely known for a regime marked by systematic human rights abuses.

As for the left-of-center candidate, Moon Jae-in, a former human rights lawyer once jailed for challenging the regime of Park’s father -- the polls show him closing the gap on Park’s narrow lead.

But despite hailing from very different political backgrounds, Park’s move to the center in order to distance herself from the unpopular outgoing president Lee Myung-bak, has left few major differences between the two candidates.

Some say Park becoming the first woman president would be unprecedented in a country where the wage gap between genders is the widest of any industrialized country. But a writer at The Independent calls Park’s success “hardly applicable” for other women trying to break the glass ceiling.

“The greatest lesson might be a dispiriting one: If you want to become a female leader, it helps if you're the child of a president.”

One issue gone unmentioned in both campaigns is any talk of the country’s democracy itself. This, in a country which up until 1987 hadn’t allowed its citizens to vote, notes a writer at the Wall Street Journal.

“Koreans now seem to take it for granted that whoever they elect this week will step down as scheduled in five years, when voters will have another chance. That change in tone is striking, even if the candidates or policy proposals aren't.”

The latest public opinion poll showed Park with a half percent lead over Moon going into the election.

South Korea Could Elect First Woman President

by Elizabeth Hagedorn
0
Transcript
Dec 18, 2012

South Korea Could Elect First Woman President

 

(Image source: TIME Magazine)  

 

BY ELIZABETH HAGEDORN

ANCHOR BRICE SANDER

 
Voting began Wednesday morning in the South Korean presidential election which pit the daughter of a former dictator against the liberal son of a North Korean refugee. Here’s CNN with the latest.

“Both candidates are highlighting the negative aspects of their rivals’ pasts, while focusing on the positives of their own, and both are hoping that the ghosts of presidents past will help propel them to the Blue House."

Known as Madame Park by her supporters, the conservative Park Geun-hye has spent much of the campaign trying to distance herself from her father’s regime -- a former South Korean president credited with developing the economy following the Korean War but more widely known for a regime marked by systematic human rights abuses.

As for the left-of-center candidate, Moon Jae-in, a former human rights lawyer once jailed for challenging the regime of Park’s father -- the polls show him closing the gap on Park’s narrow lead.

But despite hailing from very different political backgrounds, Park’s move to the center in order to distance herself from the unpopular outgoing president Lee Myung-bak, has left few major differences between the two candidates.

Some say Park becoming the first woman president would be unprecedented in a country where the wage gap between genders is the widest of any industrialized country. But a writer at The Independent calls Park’s success “hardly applicable” for other women trying to break the glass ceiling.

“The greatest lesson might be a dispiriting one: If you want to become a female leader, it helps if you're the child of a president.”

One issue gone unmentioned in both campaigns is any talk of the country’s democracy itself. This, in a country which up until 1987 hadn’t allowed its citizens to vote, notes a writer at the Wall Street Journal.

“Koreans now seem to take it for granted that whoever they elect this week will step down as scheduled in five years, when voters will have another chance. That change in tone is striking, even if the candidates or policy proposals aren't.”

The latest public opinion poll showed Park with a half percent lead over Moon going into the election.

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