(Image Source: Wikimedia Commons)

BY GEORGE DUMONTIER

ANCHOR JASMINE BAILEY

Cigarettes are linked to lung disease, dental problems, heart disease, and now declining mental health. According to a new study by King’s College London, cigarettes can “rot your brain.” Here’s the BBC

“The results showed that the overall risk of a heart attack or stroke was significantly associated with cognitive decline, and there was a consistent association between smoking and lower scores in tests.”

The study followed 8,000 middle aged adults over the course of eight years, and found that those with high blood pressure, a high BMI or a smoking habit had more trouble with memory and planning. A spokesperson for the Alzheimer's Society said,

"We all know smoking, high blood pressure, high cholesterol levels and a high BMI is bad for our heart. This research adds to the huge amount of evidence that also suggests they can be bad for our head too.”

Over time, mental decline can lead to dementia. About 1 in 3 people over the age of of 65 will develop the condition, but The Telegraph reports there are ways to help your chances.

"Eating a balanced diet, maintaining a healthy weight, exercising regularly, getting your blood pressure and cholesterol checked and not smoking can all make a difference.''

Smoking 'Rots' Brain, Study Says

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Nov 26, 2012

Smoking 'Rots' Brain, Study Says

(Image Source: Wikimedia Commons)

BY GEORGE DUMONTIER

ANCHOR JASMINE BAILEY

Cigarettes are linked to lung disease, dental problems, heart disease, and now declining mental health. According to a new study by King’s College London, cigarettes can “rot your brain.” Here’s the BBC

“The results showed that the overall risk of a heart attack or stroke was significantly associated with cognitive decline, and there was a consistent association between smoking and lower scores in tests.”

The study followed 8,000 middle aged adults over the course of eight years, and found that those with high blood pressure, a high BMI or a smoking habit had more trouble with memory and planning. A spokesperson for the Alzheimer's Society said,

"We all know smoking, high blood pressure, high cholesterol levels and a high BMI is bad for our heart. This research adds to the huge amount of evidence that also suggests they can be bad for our head too.”

Over time, mental decline can lead to dementia. About 1 in 3 people over the age of of 65 will develop the condition, but The Telegraph reports there are ways to help your chances.

"Eating a balanced diet, maintaining a healthy weight, exercising regularly, getting your blood pressure and cholesterol checked and not smoking can all make a difference.''

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