(Image source: Fox News)


BY NATHAN BYRNE


From one kind of failure — scientists find success. WZVN in Fort Myers reports — for the first time —  researchers have taken skin cells from heart-failure patients …

“ … and reprogrammed them into new heart muscle cells. Scientists say there is little chance of the immune system actually rejecting those cells. They’ll take it.”

Stem cells called hiPSCs have been used to treat damaged hearts before. But a reporter for Fox News says these new cells are different — since hiPSCs come from the person’s own body, and come with a set of complications.

“Because hiPSCs are derived from the person in need of the stem cells, they could potentially help to bypass the painful process of rejection that many transplant patients go through. … if this process is perfected, it could lead to much more localized treatments.”

An ABC News report says the cells are similar to embryonic stem cells …

“ … which can potentially be programmed to grow into any type of cell. Another advantage of using skin cells is that other types of cells taken from patients themselves, such as bone marrow cells, could potentially lead to the development of unhealthy tissue.”

According to The Guardian, this healthy heart tissue actually works.

Researchers injected the cells into a rat. Those new cells beat in time with the rat’s heart.

Boston’s WHDH tells us what makes it tick.

“The new cells are able to fuse with existing heart tissue and actually repair damage in even the most advanced patients. But researchers do say it will be another 10 years before clinical trials begin.”

The findings are published in the latest edition of the European Heart Journal.

Skin Cells Converted Into Working Heart Cells

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May 24, 2012

Skin Cells Converted Into Working Heart Cells

(Image source: Fox News)


BY NATHAN BYRNE


From one kind of failure — scientists find success. WZVN in Fort Myers reports — for the first time —  researchers have taken skin cells from heart-failure patients …

“ … and reprogrammed them into new heart muscle cells. Scientists say there is little chance of the immune system actually rejecting those cells. They’ll take it.”

Stem cells called hiPSCs have been used to treat damaged hearts before. But a reporter for Fox News says these new cells are different — since hiPSCs come from the person’s own body, and come with a set of complications.

“Because hiPSCs are derived from the person in need of the stem cells, they could potentially help to bypass the painful process of rejection that many transplant patients go through. … if this process is perfected, it could lead to much more localized treatments.”

An ABC News report says the cells are similar to embryonic stem cells …

“ … which can potentially be programmed to grow into any type of cell. Another advantage of using skin cells is that other types of cells taken from patients themselves, such as bone marrow cells, could potentially lead to the development of unhealthy tissue.”

According to The Guardian, this healthy heart tissue actually works.

Researchers injected the cells into a rat. Those new cells beat in time with the rat’s heart.

Boston’s WHDH tells us what makes it tick.

“The new cells are able to fuse with existing heart tissue and actually repair damage in even the most advanced patients. But researchers do say it will be another 10 years before clinical trials begin.”

The findings are published in the latest edition of the European Heart Journal.

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