Ready, set, search. The past few weeks have seen a flurry of innovation from the web’s heaviest hitters. Potential ‘Google Killer’ Wolfram Alpha was released on Monday, sparking debate over the future of online services.

The ‘Kumo’ search engine is Microsoft’s latest attempt at cutting into Google’s share of the search world. Microsoft currently holds a mere 8 percent market share compared to Google’s 64 percent.

PC World says Kumo faces an uphill struggle in gaining a strong following.

“If all search engines are pretty close in terms of results and key services, then maybe it's not about new features or better search results at all; maybe search preference is simply a matter of what you're used to.”

CNET puts a finer point on it – asking – “Why even try?”

“The battle for general Web search is all but over - or at least the formation of the landscape for that. It's Google, Yahoo, Microsoft - in that order.”

Also making its debut this week is the updated version of Google’s Chrome browser, which they claim is 30 percent faster than its predecessor.

However, we go back to PC World, which wonders if speed is its only focus.

“Chrome is the Lamborghini of Web browsers. It’s built to be the fastest browser out there, and--like a Lamborghini--it does so by putting powerful technology under the hood and adding just enough on top to make it street-legal, but not much more.”


Despite Chrome’s shortcomings, Technologizer takes the perspective that innovation is what’s needed for the market to advance.

“Not too long ago, it seemed as if browsers were maturing. All I can say, is that this latest round of competition is a very good thing for people who use (and create) Web apps, and those who care about standards.”

So what’s up next? Microsoft will be unveiling Kumo at the Wall Street Journal’s upcoming D: All Things Digital conference. Consumers will be keeping an eye on any further developments in the search for the next big thing.

Searching How to Search

by Nathan Giannini
0
Transcript
May 22, 2009

Searching How to Search

Ready, set, search. The past few weeks have seen a flurry of innovation from the web’s heaviest hitters. Potential ‘Google Killer’ Wolfram Alpha was released on Monday, sparking debate over the future of online services.

The ‘Kumo’ search engine is Microsoft’s latest attempt at cutting into Google’s share of the search world. Microsoft currently holds a mere 8 percent market share compared to Google’s 64 percent.

PC World says Kumo faces an uphill struggle in gaining a strong following.

“If all search engines are pretty close in terms of results and key services, then maybe it's not about new features or better search results at all; maybe search preference is simply a matter of what you're used to.”

CNET puts a finer point on it – asking – “Why even try?”

“The battle for general Web search is all but over - or at least the formation of the landscape for that. It's Google, Yahoo, Microsoft - in that order.”

Also making its debut this week is the updated version of Google’s Chrome browser, which they claim is 30 percent faster than its predecessor.

However, we go back to PC World, which wonders if speed is its only focus.

“Chrome is the Lamborghini of Web browsers. It’s built to be the fastest browser out there, and--like a Lamborghini--it does so by putting powerful technology under the hood and adding just enough on top to make it street-legal, but not much more.”


Despite Chrome’s shortcomings, Technologizer takes the perspective that innovation is what’s needed for the market to advance.

“Not too long ago, it seemed as if browsers were maturing. All I can say, is that this latest round of competition is a very good thing for people who use (and create) Web apps, and those who care about standards.”

So what’s up next? Microsoft will be unveiling Kumo at the Wall Street Journal’s upcoming D: All Things Digital conference. Consumers will be keeping an eye on any further developments in the search for the next big thing.
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