Hello I’m Charlotte Bellis and you’re watching Newsy.com….

Tuesday’s nomination of Sonia Sotomayor to the US Supreme Court pushed journalists to dig into her past. One quote has sparked controversy into Sotomayor’s views on the role her background plays in her decision-making.

During a lecture at UC Berkeley in 2001, Sotomayor said:
“A wise Latina woman with the richness of her experiences would more often than not reach a better conclusion than a white male who hasn’t lived that life.”


Sotomayor’s statement has brought the politics of personal identity to the discussion’s forefront. MSNBC’s Ed Show has this from guest Tom Tancredo…

“I’m telling you she appears to be a racist. She said things that are racist in any other context. That’s exactly how we would portray it and there’s no one who would get on the Supreme Court saying a thing like that except for a Hispanic woman and you’re going to say it doesn’t matter. Well, man. Where are you coming from? How can you possibly say that?”

A Guardian Editorial gives the perspective that identity plays a part in everyone’s decision making.

“…to attack her for saying that her ethnicity and gender are important factors when serving on the bench is to somehow assume that the life experiences of conservative white men do not colour their legal opinions.”
 

The Young Turks compares stereotypes of Sotomayor’s Latina roots to those made of Supreme Court Justice Antonin Scalia’s Italian background.

She is loud and obnoxious and she has a temper. You know that Latina temper. Now, what is interesting is that I don’t remember them complaining about Antonin Scalia’s temper.
But, Aww, come on – he’s lovable. He’s an Italian guy, he’s got a temper, that’s fine.”


The National Journal counters with the perspective that Sotomayor’s comments would be unacceptable coming from a white male.

 “…her basic proposition seems to be that white males (with some exceptions, she noted) are inferior to all other groups in the qualities that make for a good jurist.
Any prominent white male would be instantly and properly banished from polite society as a racist and a sexist for making an analogous claim of ethnic and gender superiority or inferiority.”


Finally – The Atlantic takes a historical view and points out….

“….William Rehnquist once endorsed segregation, and yet rose to be Chief Justice of the court.”

So what do you think? Please check out our sources and share your comments…

Scrutiny, Support for Sotomayor

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May 27, 2009

Scrutiny, Support for Sotomayor

Hello I’m Charlotte Bellis and you’re watching Newsy.com….

Tuesday’s nomination of Sonia Sotomayor to the US Supreme Court pushed journalists to dig into her past. One quote has sparked controversy into Sotomayor’s views on the role her background plays in her decision-making.

During a lecture at UC Berkeley in 2001, Sotomayor said:
“A wise Latina woman with the richness of her experiences would more often than not reach a better conclusion than a white male who hasn’t lived that life.”


Sotomayor’s statement has brought the politics of personal identity to the discussion’s forefront. MSNBC’s Ed Show has this from guest Tom Tancredo…

“I’m telling you she appears to be a racist. She said things that are racist in any other context. That’s exactly how we would portray it and there’s no one who would get on the Supreme Court saying a thing like that except for a Hispanic woman and you’re going to say it doesn’t matter. Well, man. Where are you coming from? How can you possibly say that?”

A Guardian Editorial gives the perspective that identity plays a part in everyone’s decision making.

“…to attack her for saying that her ethnicity and gender are important factors when serving on the bench is to somehow assume that the life experiences of conservative white men do not colour their legal opinions.”
 

The Young Turks compares stereotypes of Sotomayor’s Latina roots to those made of Supreme Court Justice Antonin Scalia’s Italian background.

She is loud and obnoxious and she has a temper. You know that Latina temper. Now, what is interesting is that I don’t remember them complaining about Antonin Scalia’s temper.
But, Aww, come on – he’s lovable. He’s an Italian guy, he’s got a temper, that’s fine.”


The National Journal counters with the perspective that Sotomayor’s comments would be unacceptable coming from a white male.

 “…her basic proposition seems to be that white males (with some exceptions, she noted) are inferior to all other groups in the qualities that make for a good jurist.
Any prominent white male would be instantly and properly banished from polite society as a racist and a sexist for making an analogous claim of ethnic and gender superiority or inferiority.”


Finally – The Atlantic takes a historical view and points out….

“….William Rehnquist once endorsed segregation, and yet rose to be Chief Justice of the court.”

So what do you think? Please check out our sources and share your comments…
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