(Image Source: Wikimedia Commons)

BY SCOTT MALONE AND NICHOLE CARTMELL

ANCHOR CHRISTINA HARTMAN

Researchers think because we can do this (make a fist), that the human hand might have evolved for fighting. News 12 Long Island explains.

“The parts of our hand that allow us to make a fist came from the need to fight for our food and our land. The study looked at the stiffness of knuckle joints after participants hit a punching bag as hard as they could.”

In his study, David Carrier from the University of Utah had volunteers with a martial arts or boxing background hit a punching bag from different directions with their hands in a range of shapes.
He found tightly clenched fists are more efficient weapons than open or loosely curled hands. Carrier theorizes natural selection drove our hands to be this way. His colleague Michael Morgan says...

''More than any other part of our anatomy, the hand represents the identity of Homo sapiens. Ultimately, the evolutionary significance of the human hand may lie in its remarkable ability to serve two seemingly incompatible but intrinsically human functions.''

A writer for the BBC spoke with the study’s lead researcher, who says many people don’t want to accept the idea that aggression may have played a key role in shaping the human body.

“‘I think there is a lot of resistance … to the idea that, at some level humans are by nature aggressive animals … I think if we acknowledged [that idea] we’d be better able to prevent violence in the future.’”

And a blogger for GeekOSystem says “It’s nice to think that the part of us that can make music is just as important and meaningful as the part that can hit things hard.”


(AOC)
According to this research, a punch delivers up to three times more force to the same amount of surface area as a slap.

Scientists Suggest Human Hands Evolved for Fighting

by Nichole Cartmell
0
Transcript
Dec 20, 2012

Scientists Suggest Human Hands Evolved for Fighting

 

(Image Source: Wikimedia Commons)

BY SCOTT MALONE AND NICHOLE CARTMELL

ANCHOR CHRISTINA HARTMAN

Researchers think because we can do this (make a fist), that the human hand might have evolved for fighting. News 12 Long Island explains.

“The parts of our hand that allow us to make a fist came from the need to fight for our food and our land. The study looked at the stiffness of knuckle joints after participants hit a punching bag as hard as they could.”

In his study, David Carrier from the University of Utah had volunteers with a martial arts or boxing background hit a punching bag from different directions with their hands in a range of shapes.
He found tightly clenched fists are more efficient weapons than open or loosely curled hands. Carrier theorizes natural selection drove our hands to be this way. His colleague Michael Morgan says...

''More than any other part of our anatomy, the hand represents the identity of Homo sapiens. Ultimately, the evolutionary significance of the human hand may lie in its remarkable ability to serve two seemingly incompatible but intrinsically human functions.''

A writer for the BBC spoke with the study’s lead researcher, who says many people don’t want to accept the idea that aggression may have played a key role in shaping the human body.

“‘I think there is a lot of resistance … to the idea that, at some level humans are by nature aggressive animals … I think if we acknowledged [that idea] we’d be better able to prevent violence in the future.’”

And a blogger for GeekOSystem says “It’s nice to think that the part of us that can make music is just as important and meaningful as the part that can hit things hard.”


(AOC)
According to this research, a punch delivers up to three times more force to the same amount of surface area as a slap.

View More
Comments
Newsy
www1