(Image source: WKBW)

 

BY FERDOUS AL-FARUQUE

 

Scientists at the University of Washington have successfully sequenced the genome of a fetus in the womb. WKBW explains how it was done:


“Researchers took blood samples from a woman who was 18-weeks pregnant, then saliva from her partner and with those two sources of DNA, they mapped the fetus’s DNA.”

Researchers found their genome sequence was a 98 percent match to the fetus after it was born. According to The Telegraph the procedure could help:

“...doctors to screen unborn babies for some 3,500 genetic disorders.

The procedure is also raising eyebrows among ethicists and religious groups over concerns it could lead to more abortions. The Daily Mail says:

“Knowing from an early stage whether their child will have a serious condition, raises the possibility that mothers-to-be might opt to terminate the pregnancy.”

But don’t expect to see the genome test at your corner pharmacy or your doctor’s office any time soon. As CNN reports, the pricetag for knowing if your baby has a genetic disorder is very hefty.

“Jay Shendure, an associate professor of genome sciences at the University of Washington, heads up that research team. Right now the process is costly. To apply in the real world, Shendure says testing would cost around $50,000.”

 

Scientists Sequence Fetal Genome

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Jun 7, 2012

Scientists Sequence Fetal Genome

 

(Image source: WKBW)

 

BY FERDOUS AL-FARUQUE

 

Scientists at the University of Washington have successfully sequenced the genome of a fetus in the womb. WKBW explains how it was done:


“Researchers took blood samples from a woman who was 18-weeks pregnant, then saliva from her partner and with those two sources of DNA, they mapped the fetus’s DNA.”

Researchers found their genome sequence was a 98 percent match to the fetus after it was born. According to The Telegraph the procedure could help:

“...doctors to screen unborn babies for some 3,500 genetic disorders.

The procedure is also raising eyebrows among ethicists and religious groups over concerns it could lead to more abortions. The Daily Mail says:

“Knowing from an early stage whether their child will have a serious condition, raises the possibility that mothers-to-be might opt to terminate the pregnancy.”

But don’t expect to see the genome test at your corner pharmacy or your doctor’s office any time soon. As CNN reports, the pricetag for knowing if your baby has a genetic disorder is very hefty.

“Jay Shendure, an associate professor of genome sciences at the University of Washington, heads up that research team. Right now the process is costly. To apply in the real world, Shendure says testing would cost around $50,000.”

 

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