(Image source: Wikimedia Commons)

BY SCOTT MALONE

ANCHOR CANDICE AVILES

A new device is allowing the visually impaired to actually see braille. KOFY explains.

“A team of scientists created a device that allows them to see braille. It streams the patterns to an implant on the person’s retina. Tests found patients could see the patterns in less than a second with 90 percent accuracy.”

The way it works is wireless signals are picked up by a receiver in the white of the man’s eye and sent to an array of electrodes attached to his retina. Those electrodes then stimulate nerve cells to relay the braille patterns to the brain. (Via The Telegraph)


A blogger for io9 points out researchers tried it once before with the Argus II technology - which initially was designed to help the visually impaired see color, movement and objects. However: that initial design wasn’t perfect. “Visual cues, such as letters and short sentences, tend to be cumbersome to read, resulting in unacceptably slow reading times.

The reworked Argus II cut reading times from about 10 seconds per letter, to only a few seconds to read words with up to 89 percent accuracy. And researchers say most of the inaccuracy appeared when the patient misread a single letter. (Via Medical Daily)

A writer for the Daily Mail says it’s a useful invention, but it can’t replace everything - and still might need another adjustment.

“It’s unlikely the system would be used to replace traditional Braille books - as a typical user can read 800 letters per minute by touch. However, the scientists say it could help blind people read street signs or other public notices if combined with video glasses and text-recognition software.”

The revamped Argus II is already available in Europe, and researchers say they hope to have it approved by the FDA for sale in the U.S.

Scientists Create Device Allowing Blind to ‘See’ Braille

by Scott Malone
0
Transcript
Nov 23, 2012

Scientists Create Device Allowing Blind to ‘See’ Braille

(Image source: Wikimedia Commons)

BY SCOTT MALONE

ANCHOR CANDICE AVILES

A new device is allowing the visually impaired to actually see braille. KOFY explains.

“A team of scientists created a device that allows them to see braille. It streams the patterns to an implant on the person’s retina. Tests found patients could see the patterns in less than a second with 90 percent accuracy.”

The way it works is wireless signals are picked up by a receiver in the white of the man’s eye and sent to an array of electrodes attached to his retina. Those electrodes then stimulate nerve cells to relay the braille patterns to the brain. (Via The Telegraph)


A blogger for io9 points out researchers tried it once before with the Argus II technology - which initially was designed to help the visually impaired see color, movement and objects. However: that initial design wasn’t perfect. “Visual cues, such as letters and short sentences, tend to be cumbersome to read, resulting in unacceptably slow reading times.

The reworked Argus II cut reading times from about 10 seconds per letter, to only a few seconds to read words with up to 89 percent accuracy. And researchers say most of the inaccuracy appeared when the patient misread a single letter. (Via Medical Daily)

A writer for the Daily Mail says it’s a useful invention, but it can’t replace everything - and still might need another adjustment.

“It’s unlikely the system would be used to replace traditional Braille books - as a typical user can read 800 letters per minute by touch. However, the scientists say it could help blind people read street signs or other public notices if combined with video glasses and text-recognition software.”

The revamped Argus II is already available in Europe, and researchers say they hope to have it approved by the FDA for sale in the U.S.

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