(Image source: Wikimedia Commons)


BY STACEY WELSH

ANCHOR CHRISTINA HARTMAN


Scientists say the hunt for the Higgs Boson — the elusive subatomic particle that could explain why the objects in the universe have weight — is drawing to a close. NPR’s Morning Edition explains why the Higgs Boson is physicists’ holy grail:

 

“King Arthur had his quest for the holy grail. For physicists the quest for the Higgs particle is pretty much the same thing. You might call it the final puzzle piece needed to complete our picture of how all the fundamental particles make up the universe.”

Researchers at Fermilab near Chicago announced they’ve found a possible range of masses the Higgs could have. But to claim a discovery, LiveScience reports physicists have to wait until statistics reach “5-sigma” — or a one in 3.5 million chance they’re wrong.

"’We're close to 3-sigma,’ said Fermilab [researcher] Rob Roser. ... ‘What that means is I'd be willing to bet your house, but not mine. At 5 sigmas, I'll bet my own house.’"

LiveScience also reports Fermilab’s findings aren’t the strongest evidence to prove the particle exists. Coincidentally, European scientists at the CERN lab, home of the Large Hadron Collider, are set to announce a possible Higgs discovery July 4. The BBC reports both experiments have found similar evidence of the so-called “God particle.”

“People are saying that each experiment, using different methods, has found the blips in the same place and more or less in the location that the theory predicted.”

Despite decades of work and billions of dollars spent on the world’s largest particle accelerator, the announcement won’t call for fireworks. Sci-Tech Today reports...

“...experts familiar with the research at CERN's vast complex on the Swiss-French border say that the massive data they have obtained will essentially show the footprint of the key particle... all but proving it exists...”

Physicists are caught up in the hype, but what does it mean for everyone else? The Daily Bhaskar reports:

“The discovery of the Higgs boson won't change people's lives, but will help explain the underpinnings of the universe. It would confirm the standard model of physics that explains why fundamental particles have mass. Those particles are the building blocks of the universe."

 

Scientists Announce New Findings on Higgs Boson

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Jul 2, 2012

Scientists Announce New Findings on Higgs Boson

(Image source: Wikimedia Commons)


BY STACEY WELSH

ANCHOR CHRISTINA HARTMAN


Scientists say the hunt for the Higgs Boson — the elusive subatomic particle that could explain why the objects in the universe have weight — is drawing to a close. NPR’s Morning Edition explains why the Higgs Boson is physicists’ holy grail:

 

“King Arthur had his quest for the holy grail. For physicists the quest for the Higgs particle is pretty much the same thing. You might call it the final puzzle piece needed to complete our picture of how all the fundamental particles make up the universe.”

Researchers at Fermilab near Chicago announced they’ve found a possible range of masses the Higgs could have. But to claim a discovery, LiveScience reports physicists have to wait until statistics reach “5-sigma” — or a one in 3.5 million chance they’re wrong.

"’We're close to 3-sigma,’ said Fermilab [researcher] Rob Roser. ... ‘What that means is I'd be willing to bet your house, but not mine. At 5 sigmas, I'll bet my own house.’"

LiveScience also reports Fermilab’s findings aren’t the strongest evidence to prove the particle exists. Coincidentally, European scientists at the CERN lab, home of the Large Hadron Collider, are set to announce a possible Higgs discovery July 4. The BBC reports both experiments have found similar evidence of the so-called “God particle.”

“People are saying that each experiment, using different methods, has found the blips in the same place and more or less in the location that the theory predicted.”

Despite decades of work and billions of dollars spent on the world’s largest particle accelerator, the announcement won’t call for fireworks. Sci-Tech Today reports...

“...experts familiar with the research at CERN's vast complex on the Swiss-French border say that the massive data they have obtained will essentially show the footprint of the key particle... all but proving it exists...”

Physicists are caught up in the hype, but what does it mean for everyone else? The Daily Bhaskar reports:

“The discovery of the Higgs boson won't change people's lives, but will help explain the underpinnings of the universe. It would confirm the standard model of physics that explains why fundamental particles have mass. Those particles are the building blocks of the universe."

 

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