BY JIM FLINK AND DANNY MATTISON

ANCHOR:  JIM FLINK

The man known as “Stormin’ Norman,” American Military General H. Norman Schwarzkopf, has died.   Here’s euronews.

“In 1991 an aerial bombardment was followed by a rapid ground campaign that drove Saddam Hussein’s forces out of Kuwait.”  
“Schwarzkopf defended the decision not to oust Hussein from power, and was ambivalent about the US invasion 12 years later.”


The New York Times notes, Schwarzkopf was little known, when President George H.W. Bush chose him to lead American and more than 30 allied forces in an attack on Iraqi leader Saddam Hussein in 1991.

“In Operation Desert Storm, General Schwarzkopf orchestrated one of the most lopsided victories in modern warfare, a six-week blitzkrieg by a broad coalition of forces with overwhelming air superiority that liberated tiny Kuwait from Iraqi occupation, routed Saddam Hussein’s Republican Guard and virtually destroyed Iraq’s infrastructure, all with relatively light allied losses.”

For all his many supporters, critics believed Schwarzkopf to be too bombastic at times. The BBC notes, the hot-tempered and charismatic general rarely was left short of words.

“Despite his fiery reputation and bluff appearance, he clashed with subordinates and superiors alike, he was smarter and more diplomatic than many critics gave him credit for.”

When he retired from military life, Schwarzkopf resisted offers to enter politics. The Wall Street Journal notes, he did have a way with words.

“Asked at a press briefing in 1991 about Mr. Hussein's military skills, the general gave one of his blunt and biting retorts: "He is neither a strategist, nor is he schooled in the operational art, nor is he a tactician, nor is he a general, nor is he a soldier. Other than that, he's a great military man—I want you to know that."

Norman Schwarzkopf died in Tampa, Florida Thursday at the age of 78.
 

Schwarzkopf Remembered as Charismatic, Bombastic Leader

by Jim Flink
0
Sources:BBC
Transcript
Dec 28, 2012

Schwarzkopf Remembered as Charismatic, Bombastic Leader

BY JIM FLINK AND DANNY MATTISON

ANCHOR:  JIM FLINK

The man known as “Stormin’ Norman,” American Military General H. Norman Schwarzkopf, has died.   Here’s euronews.

“In 1991 an aerial bombardment was followed by a rapid ground campaign that drove Saddam Hussein’s forces out of Kuwait.”  
“Schwarzkopf defended the decision not to oust Hussein from power, and was ambivalent about the US invasion 12 years later.”


The New York Times notes, Schwarzkopf was little known, when President George H.W. Bush chose him to lead American and more than 30 allied forces in an attack on Iraqi leader Saddam Hussein in 1991.

“In Operation Desert Storm, General Schwarzkopf orchestrated one of the most lopsided victories in modern warfare, a six-week blitzkrieg by a broad coalition of forces with overwhelming air superiority that liberated tiny Kuwait from Iraqi occupation, routed Saddam Hussein’s Republican Guard and virtually destroyed Iraq’s infrastructure, all with relatively light allied losses.”

For all his many supporters, critics believed Schwarzkopf to be too bombastic at times. The BBC notes, the hot-tempered and charismatic general rarely was left short of words.

“Despite his fiery reputation and bluff appearance, he clashed with subordinates and superiors alike, he was smarter and more diplomatic than many critics gave him credit for.”

When he retired from military life, Schwarzkopf resisted offers to enter politics. The Wall Street Journal notes, he did have a way with words.

“Asked at a press briefing in 1991 about Mr. Hussein's military skills, the general gave one of his blunt and biting retorts: "He is neither a strategist, nor is he schooled in the operational art, nor is he a tactician, nor is he a general, nor is he a soldier. Other than that, he's a great military man—I want you to know that."

Norman Schwarzkopf died in Tampa, Florida Thursday at the age of 78.
 

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